Category Archives: Mind

Peace of Mind

SPECIAL COMPILATION OF ‘QUOTES’ RELATED TO LIFE, MIND, PEACE

peace-of-mind-1280Peace is not something that you create; peace is not something that happens. Peace is something that always is.

Peacefulness is being projected as the highest thing because when someone has a disturbed mind, peace will be the highest goal in their perspective.

woman meditating on the beach

 Life’s Philosophy


 

One Buddha Teaching that will Tell You More About Yourself Than Anything Else

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

buddha-1024x571

NO-SELF

In Buddhism one of the ‘Three Characteristics’ is No-Self (the other two are impermanence and suffering which are closely associated with this). This refers to the illusion of reality having a permanent and separate self.

There is this notion that there is a permanent “I” or “me,” which is a separate entity that can be found. The obvious assumption of we are our body sounds good until we look at it and say “this is my body,” which implies at that moment that whatever owns the body wasn’t the body. The observer and the observed; duality denies our body being what we are. It is also in a state of impermanence, and at a sensate level it is made up of energy flickering at a similar rate to reality.

Perhaps thoughts are the “I.” They may seem more like the true “me” than the body does. But they come and go and are changing constantly too, as well as the majority of them not being under our control at all. They too aren’t something solid enough to assume they are the “I.” The ego is a process of identification with reality (physical and mental phenomena), not a thing in and of itself; it is like a bad habit. Not being a thing, it cannot be destroyed as some people say, but by understanding our bare experience, our mind, the process of identification can stop.

There is also something frequently called the “watcher” or “observer,” which is observing all of these phenomena. Strangely, the watcher can’t be found either, as it seems to sometimes be our eyes, sometimes not; sometimes it’s images in our head; sometimes it seems to be our body and sometimes it’s watching the body. It seems odd that this watcher to which all of this is being perceived by, which seems separate from reality and which seems in control of “us” is constantly changing and completely unfindable.

One of the biggest clues in solving this mystery is that if we are observing it, then by definition it isn’t us. Reality is made up entirely of sensations, and to begin to unravel this mystery is to begin to awaken. Reality with a sense of a separate watcher is a delusion. So who or what is it that awakens?

WHAT AWAKENS?

In short, it’s all of this transience that awakens! Here’s an explanation, keep in mind this is an attempt at summarising something quite complicated.

No-Self teachings directly counter the sense that there is a separate watcher, and that this watcher is “us” that is in control, observing reality or subject to the tribulations of the world. These teachings stop the process of mentally creating the illusion of a separate self from sensations that are inherently non-dual and utterly transient.

buddhaThere are physical phenomena (everything we perceive with our senses) and mental phenomena (thoughts, feelings, emotions). These are just phenomena, and all phenomena aren’t a permanent, separate self as they are completely impermanent and are intimately interdependent. These phenomena arise and pass as we venture through reality, i.e. the sound of a bird singing comes into existence and then dissipates.

There is also awareness of these phenomena, but awareness is not a thing or localised in a particular place, so to even say “there is awareness” is already a large problem, as it implies separateness and existence of it where none can be found. Awareness is permanent and unchanging, and it is said that all things arise from it, and all things return to it. It could be called God, Nirvana, The Tao, Allah, the present moment, the Buddha nature or just awareness.

While phenomena are in flux from their arising to their passing, there is awareness of them. Thus, awareness is not these phenomena, as it is not a thing, nor is it separate from these objects, as there would be no experience if this were so.

TRUE-SELF

True-Self teachings point out that we actually are all these phenomena, rather than them being seen as observed. As phenomena are observed, they can’t possibly be the observer.

Thus, the observer, which is awareness, cannot possibly be a phenomenon and thus is not localised and therefore doesn’t exist. Duality implies something on both sides: an observer and an observed. However, there is no phenomenal observer, so duality doesn’t hold up under careful investigation. When the illusion of duality permanently collapses in awakening, in direct experience, all that is left is these phenomena, which is the True Self.

There’s a great little Buddhist poem by Kalu Rinpoche that sums all this up:

We live in illusion and the appearance of things.
There is a reality, we are that reality.
When you understand this, you will see “you” are nothing.
And, being nothing, you are everything.

Source: The Open Mind

 

 

How to Use Meditation and Mindfulness to Improve Your Life

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

group-meditation-outdoors-phuketcleanse

With everyday stresses putting pressure on all of our lives, it sometimes becomes hard to feel motivated and with the weight of the world on your shoulders, you may become unhappy with your life.

Meditation and Mindfulness are two approaches that are generally associated with relaxation and appreciating the world around you, however they can also be used as a part of everyday life to improve our mindset and the way we live.

Mindfulness is the act of becoming aware of everything around you, how you’re feeling and the stream of consciousness that flows through your mind. Noticing and appreciating the thoughts that enter and leave our minds is a good way to remind ourselves that every thought does indeed come and go, much like everything else in life, namely our problems.

One of the ways people experience mindfulness is through meditation and this can give you the tools to be centred, calm and happy in any situation.

Improve your life:

5 minutes every morning can increase your chances of a better day.

Just 5 minutes of meditation helps you to start your day in a relaxed state, with a clear mind, and it allows you can determine your focus for the day ahead. Waking up slightly earlier and working meditation into your routine, even for five minutes a day, can have enormous benefits on your health. Use this time to prepare for the day ahead and to visualise how you’d like the day to go – you are in control of your day.

It can help you discover the answers to difficult problems in life.

Sometimes we need to discuss problems in order to come to a conclusion, but often this isn’t possible as other people may not always be available. Spending time each day to consider each problem and their potential solutions, in turn, may give you the answer you’ve been looking for. Focusing on one problem at a time and entering into the calm meditative state may be what you need to discover the answers you need in order to move forward.

Meditation reduces anxiety & allows you to focus on the positive.

Being able to focus on positive thoughts and letting the negative ones flowing out of your mind will make you feel happier, fact. Putting positive energy out into the world and consciously thinking positive thoughts will impact the way you subconsciously think too. Feeling positive and being accepting of negative thoughts naturally reduces anxiety and allows you to develop a calm mindset.

It allows you to let go of pain.

Everyone is holding onto baggage that they push to the back of their mind and refuse to acknowledge. Being mindful of this painful memory can help you come to terms with it, accepting it as part of life and eventually no longer allowing it to affect you in the same way. Letting go of these painful moments makes you feel less bitter which will, in turn, improve the way you see the world.

Being mindful and practicing meditation takes time, but the advantages outweigh the time it takes to learn the skill. Once you begin to understand your mind and accept your feelings, there’s no limit to the possibilities ahead of you.

Source: LifeAdvancer

30 Simple Things You Don’t Realize You Do That Impress Everyone Around You

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

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One the biggest mistakes people make when they’re trying to impress someone is that they assume people only pay attention to the important or “big” things they do. But the reality is that the little things are what matter most. It’s the little things we do or don’t do every day that shape us in to who we are. The little things determine how we respond when big things come in to our lives.

The kind of image you present to the world is determined by your actions, comments, attitude, behavior and even appearance. These things can be noticed within the first few seconds of meeting someone. So, how do you let people know who you really are? How do you impress everyone around you without big gestures or a lot of time? These 30 things might be simple, but they have a big impact. Their effects are lasting. People will remember the little things you do and that can make the difference you’re looking for.

1. Dress the Part

Your appearance is the thing people see first. They look at your clothes, hair, shoes, etc. They make assumptions about you before you even open your mouth. If you want to impress people, dress for the occasion. Take time to get ready in the morning.

2. Be on Time

If you’re late for something, you’re giving someone the opportunity to judge you without you even being there. If you say you’re going to be somewhere at a certain time, then be there at that time. Waiting for someone when they should already be there is frustrating and annoying.

3. Don’t Break your Promises

There are too many people out there making promises they know they can’t keep. They promise something because it makes the other person feel better in that moment. The problem with that is that down the road, when you don’t follow through, the comfort that person felt turns into discouragement, frustration and even anger. If you can’t keep a promise, don’t make it. If you do make a promise, do everything you can to keep it.

4. Respect Others

This includes your elders, minors, co-workers, family members, etc. This can be hard when you have to be around someone who has differing opinions than you, or who acts in a way you don’t approve of. But you can still be civil. If you look for attributes you respect in people, you will find them.

5. Be Involved

If you support going green, then go green in your life. If you support your local government, then attend community meetings. Be a part of the things that matter to you.

6. Say, “Please,” and, “Thank you,” often

These are small words, but they go a long way. Expressing your gratitude to people, even for the smallest acts of kindness, shows that you see the good in people; it shows that you pay attention to the things people around you are doing and saying.

7. Smile Often

Smiles are contagious. If a stranger walks past you at the store and smiles, it is a natural response to smile back. Seeing someone smile can remind others that there are things to be grateful for, that life is fun and exciting.

8. Don’t be Constantly using your Phone

When you are with someone, be with them. Phones are an amazing piece of technology. But they are also a distraction. Use your phone when it’s appropriate. You don’t need it out every second of every day.

9. Be Faithful to Your Partner

We hear story after story about divorces and infidelity. It’s everywhere. By being honest and true with your partner, you are showing that you know where your priorities are. You understand what it means to be in a healthy relationship.

10. Support Your Children

Take time to be involved in your kids’ lives. Know what they’re interested in. Go their games, recitals, competitions, parent-teacher conferences, etc. Listen when they talk to you. Be the kind of parent they know they can go to when they have questions.

11. Personal Hygiene isn’t an Option, it’s a Requirement

Have breath mints handy. Wear deodorant. Brush your teeth. Wear clean clothes. These are things that should be common sense, but some people really struggle with them. Talking to someone with bad breath is gross. It’s distracting. All you can think about is that you want to give them a mint. Take care of your personal hygiene and people will be more focused on what you’re saying and doing instead of how you smell.

12. Speak Clearly and Make Eye Contact

Let the person you’re talking to know that you are engaged in the conversation and that you care about what you’re discussing. Don’t mumble or look around, keep your focus on them.

13. Don’t Chew Gum

This can depend on the type of situation you’re in. If you’re with family hanging out or with close friends at the movies, gum is fine. But in a professional situation, gum is distracting.

14. Use Humor

This can lighten the mood and bring people down from a tense state. Just make sure you’re using this at appropriate times.

15. Greet People with a Handshake or Hug

Determine what type of situation you’re in. You probably don’t want to go in to an interview and hug your potential boss, but you should offer them a firm handshake. With close friends and family members a hug shows a level of intimacy. It shows that you love and care about them and gives you a way to physically express that.

16. Be True to Yourself

Know what you want out of life and do everything you can to achieve it.

17. Listen to Others

When someone is talking to you, listen to what they are saying. Don’t be thinking of a response while they are still talking.

18. Perform Acts of Kindness

Open the door for someone, collect your neighbor’s mail when they go out town, make dinner for someone who just had a baby.

19. Be Organized

Have a schedule and know what you have going on. Know where things are in your house, at work, in your car, etc.

20. Compliment People

Look for the good in people around you and take the time to let them know you noticed. Compliment them on their clothes, their work, their attitude, anything you can think of.

21. Share Knowledge and Information with Others

When you have a skill or talent, share it. Teach others and share what you know and have learned.

22. Be Positive and Focus on the Good

This can be hard when times are tough, but it’s possible. Look for the solution instead of focusing on the problem. Stay positive.

23. Help Others

Help when and where you can. In most cases, chances to serve aren’t always at the most opportune times, but sacrificing your time to help someone in need says a lot about you.

24. Keep a Clean Car

Take your car through the car wash every so often. Clean out the inside. Don’t let garbage pile up. You never know when you’re going to have to give someone a ride.

25. Care about People

Don’t build up a wall to “protect” your feelings. Let yourself feel, let yourself care for people.

26. Don’t Take Offense

Things will be said and people will do things, purposefully or accidentally, that could hurt you. You can choose to be offended or to move past it.

27. Own up to Your Mistakes

When you make a mistake, admit it, own up to it, do what you can to fix it and move on.

28. Take Advantage of Experiences Life Has to Offer

If you get the opportunity to go somewhere new, learn a new talent or try something new, do it! Enjoy life.

29. Know What’s Going on in the World

Be up to date on recent news, both local and global. Be informed.

30. Travel

The world is a big place. Take the time to go out and meet new people, learn new cultures and make new memories.

Source: LifeHack

Harvard Study Unveils What Meditation Literally does to the Brain

Source: Peaceful of Life

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

meditation

Numerous studies have indicated the many physiological benefits of meditation, and the latest one comes from Harvard University.

An eight week study conducted by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) determined that meditation literally rebuilds the brains grey matter in just eight weeks. It’s the very first study to document that meditation produces changes over time in the brain’s grey matter. (1)

“Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day. This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.”

(1) Sara Lazar of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program and a Harvard Medical School Instructor in Psychology

The study involved taking magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain’s of 16 study participants two weeks prior to participating in the study. MRI images of the participants were also taken after the study was completed.

“The analysis of MR images, which focused on areas where meditation-associated differences were seen in earlier studies, found increased grey-matter density in the hippocampus, known to be important for learning and memory, and in structures associated with self-awareness, compassion and introspection.” (1)

For the study, participants engaged in meditation practices every day for approximately 30 minutes. These practices included focusing on audio recordings for guided meditation, non-judgmental awareness of sensations, feelings and state of mind.

“It is fascinating to see the brain’s plasticity and that, by practicing meditation, we can play an active role in changing the brain and can increase our well-being and quality of life. Other studies in different patient populations have shown that meditation can make significant improvements in a variety of symptoms, and we are now investigating the underlying mechanisms in the brain that facilitate this change.”

(1) Britta Holzel, first author of the paper and a research fellow at MGH and Giessen University in Germany

How To Meditate

A common misconception about meditation is that you have to sit a certain way or do something in particular to achieve the various benefits that it can provide. All you have to do is place yourself in a position that is most comfortable to you. It could be sitting cross legged, lying down in a bed, sitting on a couch etc, it’s your choice.

Another common misconception about meditation is that you have to “try” to empty your mind. One important factor I enjoyed reading from the study mentioned above is that participants were engaged in “non-judgmental awareness of sensations, feelings and state of mind.” When meditating, you shouldn’t try to “empty” your mind. Instead, try to let your thoughts, feelings and whatever emotions you are feeling at the time flow. Don’t judge them, just let them come and go and be at peace with it.

I also believe that meditation is a state of being/mind more than anything else. I feel that one does not have to sit down for half an hour and “meditate” so to speak in order to reap the benefits of it, or to be engaged in the practice itself. One can be engaged in meditation while they are on a walk, for example, or the time they have right before they sleep. Throughout the day, one can resist judging their thoughts, letting them flow until they are no more, or just be in a constant state of peace and self awareness. Contrary to popular belief, there is more than one way to meditate.

“You will have to understand one of the most fundamental things about meditation: that no technique leads to meditation. The old so-called techniques and the new scientific biofeedback techniques are the same as far as meditation is concerned. Meditation is not a byproduct of any technique. Meditation happens beyond mind. No technique can go beyond mind.” – Osho

The Three Evils

Source: Peaceful of Life

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

54

Beings Suffer by Greed, Hate & Ignorance!

By its means they are greedy, this itself is greed. Greed and all its dilutions such as desire, lust, urge, yearning, craving, wanting, longing, & hoping all has the characteristic of grasping an object, like an adhesive glue attaching to it. The function is sticking, binding, and clinging to it, like meat put in a hot pan. It is manifested as not giving up, not releasing, & inability to drop the object.

Greed’s

proximate cause is seeing enjoyment in things, that lead to bondage! Swelling with the current of craving, it should be regarded as taking beings with it to the states of loss, as a swift- flowing river whirls to a great ocean…!

Hate

itself hates, by its characteristic ferocious, vicious and furious rage, like a provoked snake. Its function is to spread, like a drop of poison, and to grow up its own source, like a forest fire. Hate is manifested as a cruel persecution, like an enemy who has got his chance. The proximate cause of hate, anger, irritation, aversion, and opposition is any source of annoyance.

It should be regarded as like stale urine mixed with poison…!

Ignorance

has the characteristic of blindness, delusion or simply unknowing. Its function and consequence is non-penetration, by concealment of the real individual essence of an object. It is manifested as the absence of right view, and a deep mental darkness. The proximate cause of ignorance is unreasoning and wrongly directed attention neglecting all analysis of cause and effect… It should be regarded as the deepest root of all, that is disadvantageous…!

Source: Hate itself hates, by its characteristic ferocious, vicious and furious rage, like a provoked snake. Its function is to spread, like a drop of poison, and to grow up its own source, like a forest fire. Hate is manifested as a cruel persecution, like an enemy who has got his chance. The proximate cause of hate, anger, irritation, aversion, and opposition is any source of annoyance.

It should be regarded as like stale urine mixed with poison…!

Einstein On Buddhism

Source: Peaceful of Life

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

einstein

“Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future: It transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and spiritual; and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.

If there is any religion that would cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism.

A human being is part of the whole, called by us ‘Universe’; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest – a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and affection for a few persons nearest us.

Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.”

Nine Powerful Life Lessons from Studying with a Monk

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

Source: Peaceful of Life. By Robert Piper

monk

When I was 18 years old, I suffered from anxiety and stomach problems. A compassionate physician and practicing Buddhist referred me to a Taoist monk who specialized in meditation and martial arts. I ended up healing myself of anxiety and stomach issues by doing meditation, and went on a great journey of self-discovery.

Here are 9 lessons I learned while studying with a monk:

1. Keep trying until you get it right.

The most important life lesson I learned was trying something three times (maybe even four times) before you stop trying and move on. Also, this monk taught me that, even after multiple tries, you should work on different angles to approach things that are difficult.
If you keep trying, you’ll eventually get where you’re going.

2. The answer to your question is inside of you.

As part of the original monastery training, a monk didn’t answer direct questions from a student unless it was a well thought-out question. A Chinese proverb says, “Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself.”

Some forms of Zen Buddhism use a very similar style of training. An old saying (by Taoist monks) goes like this: “In making a four corner table, the teacher shows the student how to make one corner. It’s the student’s job to figure out how to make the other three.”
They did this because they were preparing a student to deal effectively with problems in the real world.

I traveled to South Korea one time, and I found it fascinating how much you have to rely on your intuition when you don’t speak the native language of a country. I remember one instance, I had trouble explaining to the cab driver where my hotel was, and he didn’t speak English. So I had to get out of the cab and ask several people until I could find someone to tell the cab driver in Korean how to get to my hotel.

In life, whenever we try new things, we have to go into new places with only a small amount of information. The real world doesn’t give us all the answers. The greatest teacher is inside of us.

3. Real wisdom in life comes from doing something and failing.

Prior to starting meditation, I used to get upset when I’d try something and fail.

I’ve been in sales since I was sixteen. I remember going to work and getting so angry with myself because I didn’t get a sale. If I ever got rejected, I’d get upset with myself, and I’d want to quit my job. But I just keep failing over and over—until I became good at it.

I remember, when I first started doing meditation, I ran into several problems. For example, at first it was difficult to calm down; but if you stick with it, its gets easier and easier. I tried for only a few minutes, and then every day, I added more time onto my meditation.

When we struggle, we learn about ourselves and what we need to do to become stronger.

4. When you start to do meditation you recognize the egotistical mind.

Everything in the ego’s world is the result of comparing. I compared myself to other salesmen and would blame myself because I wasn’t making as much money as them.

When I started doing meditation, I began to build separation from this egoistical mind, which is consistently making these comparisons. A lot of us try something and get rejected, so we give up. Even worse, we blame ourselves for a long time and get depressed.

When I started to do meditation, I began to identify my ego and was able to build separation from it.

That’s what happens when we meditate: We separate from the part of ourselves that dwells on comparisons, and start learning to live a life that isn’t driven by our egos.

5. We must be both compassionate and resilient.

The monk wouldn’t meet with me to train unless I called him a minimum of three times. I hated this part. I used to call and call and he would never answer. But this is how life is. How many times do you have to call or email someone to get something done in the real world? It’s usually several times.

Most of us blame ourselves when we try once to do something and fail. At the time, I hated this part of the training, but now I think it was the most important life lesson.

There’s a Taoist proverb that says, “Cotton on the outside, steel on the inside.”

It reminds us to be compassionate, but not weak.

6. Patience is a virtue.

The monk always made me wait—and I dreaded this.

For example, when I got to his house to train, he’d make me wait for a minimum of a half-hour, sometimes longer. We’d go out to dinner on Friday nights and he’d show up at the restaurant an hour late.

He’d tell me to meet him at a particular restaurant at 7:00. I’d get there and find out that he wasn’t there. So I’d usually be sitting in the restaurant by myself fumbling with my phone, acting like I was texting someone, while worrying about what everyone at the restaurant was thinking about me.

Keep in mind, it’s not like I could call him; I don’t think the guy ever turned his cell phone on. Then he’d show up at about 8:15 and act like nothing happened.

His first question was always, “How’s your mother and father?” (Of course in my head I’m thinking, “What do you mean, ‘How’s my mother and father?’ I just waited here for an hour and fifteen minutes.”)

But after a few years of this, it never bothered me; and not only that, it spread to every area of my life. Because of this training, I can honestly say that I very rarely get upset about anything. I never get agitated anymore when I have to wait in a long line or when someone cuts me off on the highway.

Patience is the gift of inner calm.

7. Detach from your ego.

At first, it’s hard to sit at a restaurant by yourself. You’re constantly worrying, thinking that people probably think you’re a loser because you’re sitting by yourself. But the reality is, you will never be happy if you care about what people think you!

Prior to starting meditation, I’d get upset over just about anything. Now, nothing really bothers me. Recently, I was in the airport and there was a several hour delay on my flight. I just used that time to do meditation. Ten years ago, I would have become extremely upset. An airplane delay would have ruined my day.

When you let go of your ego needs, it’s easier to accept and even benefit from whatever comes at you.

8. In Taoism, they say, “No self, No enemy.”

It’s the enemy within that causes all of our fears, worries, and insecurities. If you come to terms with this enemy within, it will impact every area of your life. It’s the identification with the “self/ego” that causes all of life’s problems.

How many times do we not go for something because of fear? Think about all the fears that we have conjured up in our minds that stop us from being truly happy. If you can conquer the enemy within yourself, you won’t have an enemy outside yourself.

9. Happiness come from within, and also comes from outside.

I learned this from observing the Buddhist Physician I met. He used to do meditation in his office before he would interact with his patients. He was one of the happiest and most compassionate people I’ve ever met.

By creating happiness inside, he was able to increase that emotional state by spreading it to others.

We must cultivate happiness from within, and work to spread it around to everyone we interact with. The monk used say, “Everyone has a purpose or a mission in life.”

We have to find happiness within, and also find our purpose on the outside.

7 Powerful Quotes For When You Feel Lost In Life

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

Source: Peace of Life

There are moments in our lives where we feel utterly and entirely lost. There are no clear directions or paths for us to take, just one big ball of confusion without an instruction manual or a tutorial as to how to “live.”

7-powerful-quotes

This is more than okay, for we all become lost in life every now and then. Sometimes it’s better to surrender yourself to the universe and let the world show you your next adventure.

The next time you feel like you’re completely lost, remembering these quotes could save you a lot of trouble and time the next time it happens to you!

1. “You can’t start the next chapter of your life if you keep re-reading the last one.”

If you are constantly looking back on the past, then you can never truly live in the present. You must keep moving forward in your life no matter how lost you feel. Now’s the time for you to go out there and discover new and amazing things you could be enjoying!

2. “Sometimes you need to talk to a three-year-old just so you can understand life again.”

This means that sometimes adults too often let the serious things in life suck all the joy and fun away from their lives. Sometimes we need to have a quick chat with the younger side of ourselves to revisit what it means to live again. Let yourself be a kid every now and then, not everything needs to be so critical all of the time.

3. “Sometimes you need to step outside, get some air, and remind yourself of who you are and where you want to be.”

This is pretty self-explanatory. However, there are times where the answer is not always clear, reminding us of who we are, what we love doing, and where we would rather be right now. Sometimes the answer for a new direction or path is usually the obvious one right in front of us.

4. “If it doesn’t open, it’s not your door.”

If your calling isn’t exactly calling back to you, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Perhaps it was something that you really wanted to try but didn’t work out. That’s alright, there are bound to be other doors that you can open, that are made to be opened specifically by you. Never stop finding new opportunities to test yourself!

5. “If you don’t like where you are, move. You are not a tree.”

If you are not satisfied with where you are living, then be that change you so desire. Find the place that is just right for you, and stop at nothing to achieve those dreams and goals. If there is nothing holding you back and you have the means to go and fight for what you want most, do it. Follow your gut instincts!

6. “Sometimes the bad things that happen in our lives put us directly on the path to the best things that will ever happen to us.”

One of the most important lessons in life that we must learn is how to accept the good times, along with the bad times, in our lives. Sometimes, the bad things that happened to us, happened for a reason, giving us a new path to go on for newer and better things. It may be hard, but find that new direction to embark on, take it, and never stop moving forward.

7. “Always remember that your present situation is not your final destination. The best is yet to come.”

Remember that not everything is permanent. Being temporary can actually be a very beautiful thing. There is always another path that can lead you to something much better or something that you’ve never experienced before. Be open to the limitless possibilities of the world around you!

It’s okay to feel lost, just remember that you have more than one path that lies ahead of you! The world will always give you the chance to try something new!

3 Ways to Slow Down and Take Better Care of Yourself

PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

Original Post By Sheila Viers – Peace of Life

Your body is precious. It is your vehicle for awakening. Treat it with care.” ~Buddha

It’s interesting how easily we forget to appreciate the simple day-to-day luxuries that we are granted with our body.

  • We assume that as we exhale, there will always be an inhalation to follow.
  • We assume that when we lay our head down on our pillow at night, our heart will beat, our blood will flow, and we will open our eyes in the morning.

We go on day after day, running around with a mile-long to-do list without taking a moment to check in with our body to acknowledge how it’s feeling today.

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Oftentimes, our health and well-being end up last on that list of priorities.

We pretend we are superhuman, existing on caffeine from Starbucks in place of adequate sleep and snacks from the vending machine in place of meals.

Maybe (hopefully) you haven’t gotten to this extreme yet, but a lot of us are. And I bet you can relate to this lack of self-care and preservation at least on some level.

Sorry to burst all of our bubbles, but this style of living is not sustainable (nor is it healthy, but you already knew that). We can’t go on like this, ignoring our health and well-being forever, as hard as we may try.

When we go-go-go without giving our body the nourishment and care that it needs to thrive, our body begins to give us the sign that it needs attention.

  • Hey, take care of me.
  • Hey, I need rest.
  • Hey, let’s slow down

Ahem, I’m serious. I’m really exhausted, foggy, and need some downtime.

It’s starts out as fatigue, but then we don’t listen. So it gets a little louder, and then louder, until eventually we have no other option but to slow down and rest. Think sickness, or worse, dis-ease.

I’ve been on this kick lately, talking and thinking a lot about how we measure ourselves up against these standards that are set so high, not even a super hero could measure up.

We strive for perfection in the eyes of our peers at the expense of our health and true happiness.

For what? What are we trying to prove? We believe that once we hit that pinnacle of success then we can relax, be happy, be good enough, and will have made it.

But the reality is that the only finish line is death, and those things that we think are going to finally prove that we are important aren’t. It’s human nature to want more. And chasing validation to prove our worthiness is the biggest “Silent Killer” of all.

There is nothing we need to prove to anyone. We are worthy now. Who we are and where we are right now is enough.

This moment, right here, is where our pot of gold is. We just have to give ourselves permission to see it as so.

And without our health, how could we ever experience these beautiful things that make life so meaningful?

It’s often last on our list of priorities, and yet, when you stop and think about it, our health is the most important of all.

Our body is our vehicle. It is what allows us to experience life. It’s our five senses, our ability to laugh and feel joy, to embrace our loved ones, to share an intimate connection, to sing, to dance, and play.

There would be no such thing as life without this body. Yet, often we treat it so poorly.
For years I would treat my body worse than any enemy. I would talk to it with disrespect and hatred. I would say things about my body that I would never in a million years say about a loved one.

I would deprive it of food, and then binge out of comfort, sometimes on food, other times on alcohol.

I would go periods without much sleep and not much movement and exercise, and then during other periods of my life I would exercise for hours in hopes of changing the way my body looked because in my eyes, it wasn’t good enough.

It’s hard for me to think back to the abuse I put my body through. This body that has always been there for me, supporting me through it all.

This body that today is so vibrant, so alive, so beautiful—to think of how hard I was on it. It just goes to show you how amazing this miracle of a machine the human body truly is. It can recover and rebuild from so much.

If you can relate and you aren’t sure how to start treating your body the way it deserves to be treated, I am here to help (and as you can see, I speak from experience).

Here are three steps to upping your self-care game so you can treat your precious body like the gift that it is.

1. Nourish It

I love the word nourishment as it applies to all things related to well-being, healing, and self-care. Nourish your body in every way you can—with nutrient-rich, tasty food, movement, and even mentally, with supportive, loving thoughts.

ACTION STEP

Take an inventory of all of these areas (food, movement, thoughts/self-talk). In what ways can you step up your game and choose options that are more nourishing to your body and spirit?

Make those adjustments and pay attention to the difference in how you feel. Continue to refine and adjust until your life as a whole is filled with experiences and things that fill you up and energize you rather than exhaust you.

2. Calendar It

The key to making time for self-care is treating it like any other VIP appointment. Things like workouts, cooking yourself a nourishing, tasty meal, exercise, massage, time with friends, romantic evenings with your partner, and fun with the kids are all important “fill-you-up” type activities.

Prioritize your priorities by carving out the time in your schedule for the things that matter to you most.

ACTION STEP

Pull out your calendar and take a look at where you spend the majority of your time. Now think about this for a moment: What are your top three priorities?

Evaluate whether or not the things you spend the majority of your time doing match up with what’s most important to you.

Make adjustments as necessary to block out time for self-care and the other things that are most important to you in life.

You may need to bow out of some commitments or hand off some responsibilities that are not important for you yourself to be taking care of, in order to create this space in your schedule for the things that do matter most.

3. Start Single-Tasking

We multitask a lot, which you probably don’t know is tough on the body. For example, it’s hard for your body to prepare for and focus on the process of eating and digestion when you are trying to do it while driving, reading, or doing any of the other things we try to do while eating.

Create an environment of ease and relaxation for your body as often as possible, especially while eating.

I know in this day and age that might seem impossible, but it’s not. The key is in stripping away some of those responsibilities and “trying to measure up” type things we do in order to create more time for being present.

ACTION STEP

Multitask less, be present in the moment more. Life is so much more enjoyable when you are engaged and present versus on your phone texting, Facebooking, or talking to somebody that is not even present with you, all of the time.

So often I look around while I’m at a restaurant and I see tables upon tables of people sitting there across from each other, but rather than connecting, talking, and being present with each other, they are both looking down typing on their phones.

It’s so confusing to me. Why do we even get together in person if the person we’re with isn’t actually who we want to be connecting with?

Put down your phone, look somebody in the eye, and have a moment together. Trust me, it’s way more rewarding than whatever communicating you are doing on your phone. Text later, engage in this moment more.

The more you practice taking really good care of your body, the more it will reward you with good health, tons of clarity, energy, and the ability to experience all the good that life has to offer for years to come!

Treat your precious body with love and kindness. This is your body—yours—and it’s the only one you’ve got.