Category Archives: Liverpool Football Club

YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE LYRIC

Gerry & The Pacemakers

  • When you walk through a storm
  • Hold your head up high
  • And don’t be afraid of the dark
  • At the end of a storm
  • There’s a golden sky
  • And the sweet silver song of a lark
  • Walk on through the wind
  • Walk on through the rain
  • Though your dreams be tossed and blown
  • Walk on, walk on
  • With hope in your heart
  • And you’ll never walk alone
  • You’ll never walk alone
  • Walk on, walk on
  • With hope in your heart
  • And you’ll never walk alone
  • You’ll never walk alone

Alisson Becker wins UEFA Goalkeeper of the Year 2018-2019 Award

UEFA website, Thursday 29 August 2019

Alisson Becker has been named Goalkeeper of the Season for the 2018/19 UEFA Champions League.

Liverpool’s Alisson Becker has won the Goalkeeper of the Season award for the 2018/19 UEFA Champions League campaign.

In his first season with the Reds following a move from Roma, Alisson wore the No13 shirt but was a lucky charm throughout as Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League – making key saves in the tight final in Madrid. The 26-year-old Brazilian also kept 21 Premier League clean sheets, landing the division’s Golden Glove award.

Goalkeeper of the Season voting*

  • 1 Alisson Becker (Liverpool) – 334 points
  • 2 Marc-André ter Stegen (Barcelona) – 136 points
  • 3 Hugo Lloris (Tottenham) – 105 points
  • 4 Jan Oblak (Atlético) – 36 points
  • 5 André Onana (Ajax) – 28 points
  • 6 Ederson (Manchester City) – 20 points
  • 7 Samir Handanović (Inter) – 3 points
  • 8= Wojciech Szczęsny (Juventus) – 2 points
  • 8= David de Gea (Manchester United) – 2 points

*Only nine goalkeepers were voted for

Alisson’s 2018-2019 in Numbers

Honours: UEFA Champions League, Premier League runner-up

Individual accolades: UEFA Champions League Squad of the Season, Premier League Golden Glove

UEFA Champions League
Appearances: 13
Minutes: 1170
Clean sheets: 6
Goals conceded: 12

Domestic League
Appearances: 38
Clean sheets: 21

Alisson Testimonials

If I knew Alisson was this good, I would have paid double.
Jürgen Klopp, Liverpool manager

Alisson is everything a modern goalkeeper needs to be. I have been watching him for some years now and am a big admirer. He is comfortable with the ball, he is an excellent shot-stopper and I see that he gives confidence to his defence.
Gianluigi Buffon, Juventus goalkeeper

How Alisson was chosen

The jury comprised the coaches of the 32 clubs in the 2018/19 UEFA Champions League group stage, together with 55 journalists selected by the European Sports Media (ESM) group, representing each of UEFA’s member associations. Coaches were not allowed to vote for players from their own teams.

Jury members chose their top three players per position, with the first receiving five points, the second three and the third one. The player who received the most points in each category was named the winner.

Virgil van Dijk wins UEFA Men’s Player of the Year 2018-2019 Award

UEFA website, Thursday 29 August 2019

Virgil van Dijk has won the 2018/19 UEFA Men’s Player of the Year award.

Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk has been named UEFA Men’s Player of the Year for 2018/19.

The Dutch international beat off competition from three-time UEFA Men’s Player of the Year Cristiano Ronaldo and two-time winner Lionel Messi. The 28-year-old centre-back received the trophy on stage in Monaco during the UEFA Champions League group stage draw.

The Top Ten

  • 1 Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool & Netherlands) – 305 points
  • 2 Lionel Messi (Barcelona & Argentina) – 207 points
  • 3 Cristiano Ronaldo (Juventus & Portugal) – 74 points
  • 5 Sadio Mané (Liverpool & Senegal) – 51 points
  • 6 Mohamed Salah (Liverpool & Egypt) – 49 points
  • 7 Eden Hazard (Chelsea/Real Madrid & Belgium) – 38 points
  • 8= Matthijs de Ligt (Ajax/Juventus & Netherlands) – 27 points
  • 8= Frenkie de Jong (Ajax/Barcelona & Netherlands) – 27 points
  • 10 Raheem Sterling (Manchester City & England) – 12 points

Why did Van Dijk win the vote?

Following Liverpool’s 2018 final defeat by Real Madrid, Van Dijk had every reason for nerves ahead of the 2019 decider, but his concentration did not waver. He shut out the opposition and was named man of the match as his side edged out Tottenham Hotspur in Madrid.

Fearless since arriving from Southampton in January 2018, Van Dijk kept more clean sheets than any defender in Europe’s top five leagues in 2018/19. While Liverpool fell narrowly short in the Premier League, his solid presence (and occasional goalscoring efforts) provided the platform for a sixth European Cup.

Season in Numbers

Honours: UEFA Champions League winner, UEFA Nations League runner-up, English Premier League runner-up, PFA Players’ Player of the Year.

UEFA Champions League
Appearances: 12
Goals: 2
Assists: 2

Domestic league
Appearances: 38
Goals: 4
Assists: 2

How Van Dijk was chosen

The jury comprised the 80 coaches of the clubs that participated in the group stages of the 2018/19 UEFA Champions League (32) and UEFA Europa League (48), along with 55 journalists selected by the European Sports Media (ESM) group, one from each of UEFA’s member associations.

Van Dijk after Champions League final win
Jury members picked their top three players, with the first receiving five points, the second three and the third one. Coaches were not allowed to vote for players from their own team.

Van Dijk Testimonials

“You could write a book about Virgil van Dijk’s strengths and abilities. He is still young, but he’s so mature.”
Jürgen Klopp, Liverpool manager

“The ‘Swagger Don’. Virgil is suave on and off the pitch. He makes everything look easy, doesn’t he? When you’ve got him behind you, you’ve got that feeling of security. He’s been an absolute rock all season.”
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Liverpool midfielder

“He embodies the full picture of a defender: his radiance, the way he captains the group, his presence on the pitch, and also now the prizes – the Champions League was fantastic. He can be an example to anyone who wants to aspire to be the best.”
Ronald Koeman, Netherlands coach

What is the UEFA Men’s Player of the Year award?

For this award, players in Europe, irrespective of nationality, were judged according to their performances over the whole season in all competitions – both domestically and internationally – at either club or national team level.

Roll of Honour*

  • 2018/19 – Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool & Netherlands)
  • 2017/18 ─ Luka Modrić (Real Madrid & Croatia)
  • 2016/17 ─ Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid & Portugal)
  • 2015/16 ─ Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid & Portugal)
  • 2014/15 ─ Lionel Messi (Barcelona & Argentina)
  • 2013/14 ─ Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid & Portugal)
  • 2012/13 ─ Franck Ribéry (Bayern & France)
  • 2011/12 ─ Andrés Iniesta (Barcelona & Spain)
  • 2010/11 ─ Lionel Messi (Barcelona & Argentina)

*Known as the UEFA Best Player in Europe Award from 2010/11 to 2015/16 inclusive.

Liverpool Football Club Honours

Liverpool FC is one of the world’s most successful football clubs with 46 major first-team honours. Our Women’s team has also been crowned English champions twice, while the FA Youth Cup has been won on four occasions by the Reds.

Data as of August 2019. Total Honours is 46 excluding Charity Shiled

League Champions [18]

  1. 1900-1901
  2. 1905-1906
  3. 1921-1922
  4. 1922-1923
  5. 1946-1947
  6. 1963-1964
  7. 1965-1966
  8. 1972-1973
  9. 1975-1976
  10. 1976-1977
  11. 1978-1979
  12. 1979-1980
  13. 1981-1982
  14. 1982-1983
  15. 1983-1984
  16. 1985-1986
  17. 1987-1988
  18. 1989-1990

Liverpool have won a phenomenal 18 League Championships. The first came in 1900-01, while the last title triumph came in 1989-90 under Kenny Dalglish.

b: Never been relegated from Premier League

Data From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

UEFA Champions League Cup [6]

Winners

  1. 1976–1977 [Olympic Stadium, Rome, Italy – Bob Paisley] Liverpool 3-1 Borussia Mönchengladbach. Kevin Keegan
  2. 1977–1978 [London, England – Bob Paisley] Liverpool 1-0 Real Madrid. Kenny Dalglish
  3. 1980–1981 [Paris, France- Bob Paisley] Liverpool 1-0 Club Brugge. Kenny Dalglish
  4. 1983–1984 [Olympic Stadium, Rome, Italy – Joe Fagan] Liverpool 1 – 1 Roma. Penalty Kick 4-2. Kenny Dalglish
  5. 2004–2005 [Istambul, Turkey – Refail Benitez] Liverpool 3-3 AC Milan. Penalty Kick 3-2. Steven Gerrard
  6. 2018-2019 [Wanda Metropolitano Stadium in Madrid, Spain 1st June 2019 Jurgen Klopp] Liverpool 2-0 Tottenham Hotspur. Mohamed SalahMane Firmino.

Runner-Up [3]

  1. 1984-1985 [Heysel Stadium, Brussels] Juventus 1-0 Liverpool
  2. 2006-2007 [Stadion Olimpiade, Athena. 23 Mei 2007 Rafael Benítez] AC Milan – Liverpool 2-1. Steven Gerrard
  3. 2017-2018 [Kiev, Ukraine Jurgen Klopp] Liverpool-Real Madrid 3-1. Mohamed SalahManeFirmino.

We have proudly won six European Cups – more than any other British team. The first came under Bob Paisley, who added two more to the trophy cabinet before his successor Joe Fagan also won the famous cup. Rafael Benitez oversaw the Miracle of Istanbul in 2005, and the most recent came under Jürgen Klopp in 2019.

UEFA Champions League 2019 Gallery

FA Women’s Super League [2]

  1. 2013
  2. 2014

Liverpool FC Women, playing as Liverpool FC Ladies, won their first Women’s Super League title in 2013 and repeated the feat a year later after a dramatic season finale saw them jump from third to first.

Table by Seasson
Table by Team

FA Cup [7]

  1. 1964-1965 Liverpool 2–1 (a.e.t.) Leeds United
  2. 1973-1974 Liverpool 3–0 Newcastle United
  3. 1985-1986 Liverpool 3–1 Everton
  4. 1988-1989 Liverpool 3–2 Everton
  5. 1991-1992 Liverpool 2–0 Sunderland
  6. 2000-2001 Liverpool 2–1 Arsenal
  7. 2005-2006 Liverpool 3–3 (a.e.t.) West Ham United Pen: 3-1

Liverpool have seven FA Cups to their name. The first triumph came under Bill Shankly in 1965 when Leeds United were defeated 2-1 at Wembley.

FA CUP WINNER 2000-2001 Liverpool 2–1 Arsenal

League Cup [8]

  1. 1980-1981 Liverpool 2–1 West Ham United
  2. 1981-1982 Liverpool 3–1 (a.e.t.) Tottenham Hotspur
  3. 1982-1983 Liverpool 2–1 (a.e.t.) Manchester United
  4. 1983-1984 Liverpool 0–0 (a.e.t.) Everton 25 March 1984
    1. Replay Liverpool 1–0 Everton 28 March 1984
  5. 1994-1995 Liverpool 2–1 Bolton Wanderers
  6. 2000-2001 Birmingham City 1–1 Liverpool
  7. 2002-2003 Manchester United 0–2 Liverpool
  8. 2011-2012 Cardiff City 2–2 (p.w.) Liverpool – Penalty: 2–3

The EFL Cup (referred to historically, and colloquially, as simply the League Cup), currently known as the Carabao Cup for sponsorship reasons, is an annual knockout football competition in men’s domestic English football. Organised by the English Football League (EFL), it is open to any club within the top four levels of the English football league system – 92 clubs in total – comprising the top level Premier League, and the three divisions of the English Football League’s own league competition (Championship, League One and League Two).

No other team comes close to our tally of eight League Cups, which have been won over the course of 12 final appearances. The trophy was last brought home to Anfield in 2012 courtesy of victory over Cardiff City at Wembley.

EFL Cup winners by club

UEFA Europa League Cup [3]

  1. 1972-1973 Borussia Mönchengladbach 2–0 Liverpool
  2. 1975-1976 Club Brugge 1–1 Liverpool
  3. 2000-2001 Liverpool 5–4 (a.e.t.) Alavés

LFC have won the UEFA Europa League Cup on three separate occasions. Bill Shankly, Bob Paisley and Gerard Houllier all led their teams to the trophy, the latter thanks to a 5-4 win over Alaves in one of the most incredible European finals of all-time.

2000-2001 Liverpool 5–4 (a.e.t.) Alavés
2000-2001 Liverpool 5–4 (a.e.t.) Alavés

UEFA Super Cup [4]

Winners

  1. 1977 7-1 Vs Hamburg (Agg: 1-1 A, 6-0 H)
  2. 2001 3-2 Vs Bayern München
  3. 2005 3-1 Vs CSKA Moskva ( a.e.t. )
  4. 2019 2-2 Vs Chelsea (Penalty 5-4)

Runner-up [2]

  1. 1978 3-4 Vs Anderlecht (Agg: 1-3 A, 2-1 H)
  2. 1984 0-2 Vs Juventus

Three of Liverpool’s European Cup victories and one UEFA Cup win have been followed up with success in the season-opening Super Cup, the most recent via penalties in 2019.

Charity Shield [15]

  1. 1964* LFC 2-2 West Ham United
  2. 1965* LFC 2-1 Manchester United
  3. 1966 LFC 1-0 Everton
  4. 1974* LFC 1-1 Leeds United
  5. 1976 LFC 1-0 Southampton
  6. 1977* LFC 0-0 Manchester United
  7. 1979 LFC 3-1 Arsenal
  8. 1980 LFC 1-0 West Ham United
  9. 1982 LFC 2-1 Tottenham Hotspur
  10. 1986* LFC 1-1 Everton
  11. 1988 LFC 2-1 Wimbledon
  12. 1989 LFC 1-0 Arsenal
  13. 1990* LFC 1-1 Manchester United
  14. 2001 LFC 2-1 Manchester United
  15. 2006 LFC 2-1 Chelsea

( * shared)

The Reds have got their hands on 15 Charity/Community Shields over the years, either winning the trophy outright or, as used to be the case, sharing it with another team following a draw.

FA Youth Cup [4]

  1. 1996
  2. 2006
  3. 2007
  4. 2019

Our first FA Youth Cup triumph came in 1996 as a team containing future stars Michael Owen and Jamie Carragher defeated West Ham United. Back-to-back victories followed in 2006 and 2007, and the class of 2019 claimed a fourth success in the competition by beating Manchester City on penalties.

Finals were played over two legs; the aggregate scores are given above.
FA Youth Cup winners Table

Steven Gerrard

From Liverpool Website

Profile

Few men will ever match the legacy forged by Steven Gerrard at Liverpool FC. The only player in Reds history to feature in the club’s all-time top five for both appearances and goals, the talismanic midfielder clocked up an astonishing 710 games and found the target 186 times.

A complete footballer of undoubted world-class ability, revered by teammates and opponents alike, respected by rivals and adored by supporters, nothing seemed impossible to Gerrard – he could do everything and he gave everything.

The midfielder’s tendency to drag his teammates along with him to achieve great things is perhaps best evidenced by his unique record of having scored in the finals of the Champions League, UEFA Cup, FA Cup and League Cup.

And few players end their careers having made even one contribution to a football match as iconic as his barely believable last-minute equaliser against West Ham United in the FA Cup final, or the unforgettable half-volley against Olympiacos that kept the Reds on track for European Cup glory. That’s without mentioning the inch-perfect header that kick-started a miracle in Istanbul.

But that was Gerrard through and through during a 17-year Anfield career: The Scouser who grew up to captain his boyhood club, to be one of the best in the world, to collect trophies.

Bob Paisley

From Liverpool Website

Profile

Twenty trophies in nine seasons – not bad for a man who was loath to make the step into football management.

But then, that was the reluctant genius that was Bob Paisley, the manager given the unenviable task of succeeding the legendary Bill Shankly.

A humble son of the North East, Paisley was always more at ease in the wings rather than centre stage, but when it came to knowledge of the game and the ability to spot a player, his record spoke volumes.

Kenny Dalglish, Alan Hansen, Graeme Souness, Alan Kennedy, Ronnie Whelan, Ian Rush and Mark Lawrenson were just some of the players brought to Anfield during Bob’s time in charge and each went on to cement themselves as a club legend.

In the process, three European Cups, six league championships, three League Cups and one UEFA Cup were added to the Anfield honours board.

His achievements in such a short period in charge cannot be overstated, nor will they ever be eclipsed and he is quite rightly recognised as one of the greatest football managers of all-time.

Bill Shankly

From Liverpool Website

Profile

The most iconic figure in the history of Liverpool Football Club.

A charismatic, famously quotable man who realised his dream of turning LFC into English football’s most dominant force, Shankly’s spirit has quite rightly been stitched into the very fabric of the club.

The Scot took charge of a Second Division outfit that had been starved of success on December 1, 1959, and set about laying the foundations that would see three First Division titles, one Division Two title, two FA Cups and one UEFA Cup claimed during his time in charge.

But it is the contributions beyond simply putting trophies in the cabinet that secured Shankly’s untouchable Anfield legacy. From founding the mythical Boot Room to revitalising the club’s training facility at Melwood – his influence remained evident in the unforgettable period of success that followed under Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Kenny Dalglish.

Although the conditions for even greater victories were in place by the time Shankly announced his retirement in July 1974, Kopites were truly devastated to hear of the departure of their magnetic leader. In true Shanks fashion, though, he slipped quietly away safe in the knowledge he had set Liverpool FC on the path to greatness.

Kenny Dalglish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia & From Liverpool Website

Dalglish in Singapore, 2009

Sir Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish MBE (born 4 March 1951) is a Scottish former football player and manager. He made over three hundred appearances for both Celtic and Liverpool and earned over one hundred caps for the Scotland national team. Dalglish won the Ballon d’Or Silver Award in 1983, the PFA Players’ Player of the Year in 1983, and the FWA Footballer of the Year in 1979 and 1983. In 2009, FourFourTwo named Dalglish the greatest striker in post-war British football, and in 2006, he topped a Liverpool fans’ poll of “100 Players Who Shook the Kop“. He has been inducted into both the Scottish and English Football Halls of Fame.

Dalglish began his career with Celtic in 1971, going on to win four Scottish league championships, four Scottish Cups and one Scottish League Cup with the club. In 1977, Liverpool manager Bob Paisley paid a British transfer record of £440,000 to bring Dalglish to Liverpool. His years at Liverpool were among the club’s most successful periods, as he won six English league championships, the FA Cup, four League Cups, five FA Charity Shields, three European Cups and one European Super Cup. In international football, Dalglish made 102 appearances and scored 30 goals for Scotland between 1971 and 1986, becoming their most capped player and joint-leading goalscorer (with Denis Law).

Dalglish became player-manager of Liverpool in 1985 after the resignation of Joe Fagan, winning a further three First Divisions, a FA Cup, and four FA Charity Shields, before resigning in 1991. Eight months later, Dalglish made a return to football management with Blackburn Rovers, whom he led from the Second Division to win the Premier League in 1995. Soon afterwards, he stepped down as manager to become Director of Football at the club, before leaving altogether in 1996. In January 1997, Dalglish took over as manager at Newcastle United. Newcastle finished runners-up in both the Premier League and FA Cup during his first season, but they only finished 13th in 1997–98, which led to his dismissal the following season. Dalglish went on to be appointed Director of Football at Celtic in 1999, and later manager, where he won the Scottish League Cup before an acrimonious departure the following year.

Between 2000 and 2010, Dalglish focused on charitable concerns, founding The Marina Dalglish Appeal with his wife to raise money for cancer care. In January 2011, Dalglish returned to Liverpool for a spell as caretaker manager after the dismissal of Roy Hodgson, becoming the permanent manager in May 2011.Despite winning the League Cup which earned them a place in the UEFA Europa League, and reaching the FA Cup Final, Liverpool only finished 8th in the Premier League, and Dalglish was dismissed in May 2012. In October 2013, Dalglish returned to Anfield as a non-executive director, and had Anfield’s Centenary Stand renamed after him in May 2017.

Early Life

Dalglish, the son of an engineer, was born in Dalmarnock in the East End of Glasgow, and was brought up in Milton in the north of the city. He moved to the docklands of Govan, near Ibrox, home of Rangers, when he was 15, and he grew up supporting Rangers.

Dalglish attended Miltonbank Primary School in Milton and started out as a goalkeeper. He then attended High Possil Senior Secondary School, where he won the inter-schools five-a-side and the inter-year five-a-side competitions. He won the Scottish Cup playing for Glasgow Schoolboys and Glasgow Schools, and was then selected for the Scottish schoolboys team that went undefeated in a home nations Victory Shield tournament. In 1966 Dalglish had unsuccessful trials at West Ham and Liverpool.

Playing Career

Celtic

Dalglish signed a provisional contract with Celtic in May 1967. The club’s manager Jock Stein sent his assistant Sean Fallon to see Dalglish and his parents at their home, which had Rangers-related pictures on the walls. In his first season Dalglish was loaned out to Cumbernauld United, for whom he scored 37 goals. During this time he also worked as an apprentice joiner. Stein wanted Dalglish to spend a second season on loan at Cumbernauld, but the youngster wanted to turn professional. Dalglish got his wish, and became a regular member of the highly rated Celtic reserve team that became known as the Quality Street Gang, due to its having a large number of future Scottish internationals, including Danny McGrain, George Connelly, Lou Macari, and David Hay.] Dalglish made his first-team competitive debut for Celtic in a Scottish League Cup quarter-final tie against Hamilton Academical on 25 September 1968, coming on as a second-half substitute in a 4–2 win.

He played with the reserves throughout the 1968–69 season, but only scored four goals in 17 games. The following season, he moved into midfield, which saw his performances improve. Stein put Dalglish in the starting XI for the first team in a league match against Raith Rovers on 4 October 1969. Celtic won 7–1 but Dalglish didn’t score, nor did he score in the next three first-team games he played in during season 1969–70. The reserves, however, benefited from his goalscoring talent from midfield as he helped them to the league and cup double, with him scoring 19 goals in 31 games.

Dalglish continued his goalscoring form in the reserves into the next season, scoring 23 goals. A highlight of his season came in the Reserve Cup Final against Rangers. Dalglish scored one goal in a 4–1 win in the first leg, then in the second leg scored a hat-trick in a 6–1 win to clinch the cup. Still not a first-team regular, Dalglish was in the stands when the Ibrox disaster occurred at an Old Firm match in January 1971, when 66 Rangers fans died. On 17 May 1971, he played for Celtic against Kilmarnock in a testimonial match for the Rugby Park club’s long serving midfielder, Frank Beattie. Dalglish scored six goals for Celtic in a 7–2 win.

The 1971–72 season saw Dalglish finally establish himself in the Celtic first team, scoring 29 goals in 53 games and helping Celtic win their seventh consecutive league title. Dalglish also played in Celtic’s 6–1 win over Hibernian in the 1972 Scottish Cup Final. In 1972–73 Dalglish was Celtic’s leading scorer, with 39 goals in all competitions, and saw Celtic win yet another league championship. Celtic won a league and cup double in 1973–74 and reached the semi-finals of the European Cup. The ties against Atlético Madrid were acrimonious, and Dalglish described the first leg in Glasgow where the Spanish side had three players sent off as “without doubt the worst game I have ever played in as far as violence is concerned.”

Dalglish was made Celtic captain in the 1975–76 season, during which Celtic failed to win a trophy for the first time in 12 years. Stein had been badly injured in a car crash and missed most of that season while recovering from his injuries. Celtic won another league and cup double in 1976–77, with Dalglish scoring 27 goals in all competitions. On 10 August 1977, after making 320 appearances and scoring 167 goals for Celtic, Dalglish was signed by Liverpool manager Bob Paisley for a British transfer fee record of £440,000 (£2,685,000 today). The deal was unpopular with the Celtic fans, and Dalglish was booed by the crowd when he returned to Celtic Park in August 1978 to play in a testimonial match for Stein.

Liverpool

Dalglish was signed to replace Kevin Keegan, and quickly settled into his new club. He made his debut on 13 August 1977 in the season opener at Wembley, in the 1977 FA Charity Shield against Manchester United. He scored his first goal for Liverpool in his league debut a week later on 20 August, against Middlesbrough. Dalglish also scored three days later on his Anfield debut in a 2–0 victory over Newcastle United, and he scored Liverpool’s sixth goal when they beat Keegan’s Hamburg 6–0 in the second leg of the 1977 European Super Cup. By the end of his first season with Liverpool, Dalglish had played 62 times and scored 31 goals, including the winning goal in the 1978 European Cup Final at Wembley against Bruges.

In his second season Dalglish recorded a personal best of 21 league goals for the club, and he was also named Football Writers’ Association Footballer of the Year. He did not miss a league game for Liverpool until the 1980–81 season, when he appeared in 34 out of 42 league games and scored only eight goals as Liverpool finished fifth in the league, but still won the European Cup and Football League Cup. He recovered his goal-scoring form the following season, and was an ever-present player in the league once again, scoring 13 goals as Liverpool became league champions for the 13th time, and the third time since Dalglish’s arrival. It was also around this time that he began to form a potent strike partnership with Ian Rush; Dalglish began to play just off Rush, “running riot in the extra space afforded to him in the hole”. Dalglish was voted PFA Players’ Player of the Year for the 1982–83 season, during which he scored 18 league goals as Liverpool retained their title. From 1983 Dalglish became less prolific as a goalscorer, though he remained a regular player.

After becoming player-manager on the retirement of Joe Fagan in the 1985 close season, Dalglish selected himself for just 21 First Division games in 1985–86 as Liverpool won the double, but he started the FA Cup final win over Everton. On the last day of the league season, his goal in a 1–0 away win over Chelsea gave Liverpool their 16th league title. Dalglish had a personally better campaign in the 1986–87 season, scoring six goals in 18 league appearances, but by then he was committed to giving younger players priority for a first-team place.

With the sale of Ian Rush to Juventus in 1987, Dalglish formed a new striker partnership of new signings John Aldridge and Peter Beardsley for the 1987–88 season, and he played only twice in a league campaign which saw Liverpool gain their 17th title. Dalglish did not play in Liverpool’s 1988–89 campaign, and he made his final league appearance on 5 May 1990 as a substitute against Derby. At 39, he was one of the oldest players ever to play for Liverpool. His final goal had come three years earlier, in a 3–0 home league win over Nottingham Forest on 18 April 1987.

International

Tommy Docherty gave Dalglish his debut for the Scottish national side as a substitute in the 1–0 Euro 1972 qualifier victory over Belgium on 10 November 1971 at Pittodrie. Dalglish scored his first goal for Scotland a year later on 15 November 1972 in the 2–0 World Cup qualifier win over Denmark at Hampden Park. Scotland eventually qualified and he went to the 1974 World Cup in West Germany, where they were eliminated during the group stages despite not losing any of their three games.

In 1976, Dalglish scored the winning goal for Scotland at Hampden Park against England, by nutmegging Ray Clemence. A year later Dalglish scored against the same opponents and goalkeeper at Wembley, in another 2–1 win. Dalglish went on to play in both the 1978 World Cup in Argentina – scoring against eventual runners-up the Netherlands in a famous 3–2 win – and the 1982 World Cup in Spain, scoring against New Zealand. On both occasions Scotland failed to get past the group stage. Dalglish was selected for the 22-man squad travelling to Mexico for the 1986 World Cup, but had to withdraw due to injury.

In total, Dalglish played 102 times for Scotland (a national record) and he scored 30 goals (also a national record, which matched that set by Denis Law). His final appearance for Scotland, after 15 years as a full international, was on 12 November 1986 at Hampden Park in a Euro 1988 qualifying game against Luxembourg, which Scotland won 3–0. His 30th and final international goal had been two years earlier, on 14 November 1984, in a 3–1 win over Spain in a World Cup qualifier, also at Hampden Park.

Managerial Career

Liverpool

After the Heysel Stadium disaster in 1985 and Joe Fagan’s subsequent resignation as manager, Dalglish became player-manager of Liverpool. In his first season in charge in 1985–86, he guided the club to its first “double”. Liverpool achieved this by winning the League Championship by two points over Everton (Dalglish himself scored the winner in a 1–0 victory over Chelsea at Stamford Bridge to secure the title on the final day of the season), and the FA Cup by beating Everton in the final.

The 1986–87 season was trophyless for Liverpool. They lost 2–1 to Arsenal in the League Cup final at Wembley. Before the 1987–88 season, Dalglish signed two new players: striker Peter Beardsley from Newcastle and winger John Barnes from Watford. He had already purchased goalscorer John Aldridge from Oxford United (a replacement for Ian Rush, who was moving to Italy) in the spring of 1987 and early into the new campaign, bought Oxford United midfielder Ray Houghton. The new-look Liverpool side shaped by Dalglish topped the league for almost the entire season, and had a run of 37 matches unbeaten in all competitions (including 29 in the league; 22 wins and 7 draws) from the beginning of the season to 21 February 1988, when they lost to Everton in the league. Liverpool were crowned champions with four games left to play, having suffered just two defeats from 40 games. However, Dalglish’s side lost the 1988 FA Cup Final to underdogs Wimbledon.

In the summer of 1988, Dalglish re-signed Ian Rush. Liverpool beat Everton 3–2 after extra time in the second all-Merseyside FA Cup final in 1989, but was deprived of a second Double in the final game of the season, when Arsenal secured a last-minute goal to take the title from Liverpool. In the 1989–90 season Liverpool won their third league title under Dalglish. They missed out on the Double and a third successive FA Cup final appearance when they lost 4–3 in extra-time to Crystal Palace in an FA Cup semi-final at Villa Park. At the end of the season Dalglish received his third Manager of the Year award. Dalglish resigned as manager of Liverpool on 22 February 1991, two days after a 4–4 draw with rivals Everton in an FA Cup fifth round tie at Goodison Park, in which Liverpool surrendered the lead four times. At the time of his resignation, the club were three points ahead in the league and still in contention for the FA Cup.

Hillsborough Disaster

Dalglish was the manager of Liverpool at the time of the Hillsborough disaster on 15 April 1989. The disaster claimed 94 lives on the day, with the final death toll reaching 96. Dalglish attended many funerals of the victims – including four in one day. – and his presence in the aftermath of the disaster has been described as “colossal and heroic“. Dalglish broke a twenty-year silence about the disaster in March 2009, expressing regret that the police and the FA did not consider delaying the kick-off of the match. During the Hillsborough Memorial Service on 15 April 2011, Liverpool MP Steve Rotherham announced he would submit an Early Day Motion to have Dalglish knighted, “not only for his outstanding playing and managerial career, but also the charity work he has done with his wife, Marina, for breast cancer support and what he did after Hillsborough. It is common knowledge it affected him deeply”.

Blackburn Rovers
Dalglish returned to management in October 1991, at Second Division Blackburn Rovers. By the turn of 1992 they were top of the Second Division, and then suffered a dip in form before recovering to qualify for the playoffs,[47] during which Dalglish led Blackburn into the new Premier League by beating Leicester City 1–0 in the Second Division Play-off final at Wembley. The resulting promotion meant that Blackburn were back in the top flight of English football for the first time since 1966.[48] In the 1992 close season, Dalglish signed Southampton’s Alan Shearer for a British record fee of £3.5 million.[49] Despite a serious injury which ruled Shearer out for half the season, Dalglish achieved fourth position with the team in the first year of the new Premier League. The following year, Dalglish failed in an attempt to sign Roy Keane.[50] Blackburn finished two positions higher the following season, as runners-up to Manchester United. By this time, Dalglish had added England internationals Tim Flowers and David Batty to his squad.[citation needed]

At the start of the 1994–95 season Dalglish paid a record £5 million for Chris Sutton, with whom Shearer formed an effective strike partnership. By the last game of the season, both Blackburn and Manchester United were in contention for the title. Blackburn had to travel to Liverpool, and Manchester United faced West Ham United in London. Blackburn lost 2–1, but still won the title since United failed to win in London. The title meant that Dalglish was only the fourth football manager in history to lead two different clubs to top-flight league championships in England, after Tom Watson, Herbert Chapman and Brian Clough. Dalglish became Director of Football at Blackburn in June 1995. He left the club at the end of the 1995–96 season after a disappointing campaign under his replacement, Ray Harford.[citation needed]

Following his departure from Blackburn Dalglish was appointed for a brief spell as an “international talent scout” at his boyhood club Rangers.[51][52] He was reported as having played a central role in the signing of Chile international Sebastián Rozental.[53]

Newcastle United

In January 1997, Dalglish was appointed manager of Premier League side Newcastle United on a three-and-a-half-year contract, taking over from Kevin Keegan. Dalglish guided the club from fourth position to a runner-up spot in May and a place in the new format of the following season’s UEFA Champions League. He then broke up the team which had finished second two years running, selling popular players like Peter Beardsley, Lee Clark, Les Ferdinand and David Ginola and replacing them with ageing stars like John Barnes (34), Ian Rush (36) and Stuart Pearce (35), as well as virtual unknowns like Des Hamilton and Garry Brady. He also made some good long-term signings like Gary Speed and Shay Given. The 1997–98 campaign saw Newcastle finish in only 13th place and, despite Dalglish achieving some notable successes during the season (including a 3–2 UEFA Champions League win over Barcelona and an FA Cup final appearance against Arsenal), he was dismissed by Freddie Shepherd after two draws in the opening two games of the subsequent 1998–99 season, and replaced by former Chelsea manager Ruud Gullit. One commentator from The Independent has since written, “His 20 months at Newcastle United are the only part of Kenny Dalglish’s career that came anywhere near failure”.

Celtic

In June 1999 he was appointed director of football operations at Celtic, with his former Liverpool player John Barnes appointed as head coach. Barnes was dismissed in February 2000 and Dalglish took charge of the first team on an interim basis. He guided them to the Scottish League Cup final, where they beat Aberdeen 2–0 at Hampden Park. Dalglish was dismissed in June 2000, after the appointment of Martin O’Neill as manager. After a brief legal battle, Dalglish accepted a settlement of £600,000 from Celtic.

Return to Liverpool

Dalglish managing Liverpool in 2011

In April 2009 Liverpool manager Rafael Benítez invited Dalglish to take up a role at the club’s youth academy. The appointment was confirmed in July 2009, and Dalglish was also made the club’s ambassador. Following Benítez’s departure from Liverpool in June 2010, Dalglish was asked to help find a replacement, and in July Fulham’s Roy Hodgson was appointed manager.

A poor run of results at the start of the 2010–11 season led to Liverpool fans calling for Dalglish’s return as manager as early as October 2010, and with no subsequent improvement in Liverpool’s results up to the end of the year (during which time the club was bought by New England Sports Ventures), Hodgson left Liverpool and Dalglish was appointed caretaker manager on 8 January 2011. Dalglish’s first game in charge was on 9 January 2011 at Old Trafford against Manchester United in the 3rd round of the FA Cup, which Liverpool lost 1–0. Dalglish’s first league game in charge was against Blackpool on 12 January 2011; Liverpool lost 2–1. After the game, Dalglish admitted that Liverpool faced “a big challenge”.

Shortly after his appointment, Dalglish indicated he would like the job on a permanent basis if it was offered to him, and on 19 January the Liverpool chairman Tom Werner stated that the club’s owners would favour this option. On 22 January 2011, Dalglish led Liverpool to their first win since his return, against Wolves at Molineux. After signing Andy Carroll from Newcastle for a British record transfer fee of £35 million and Luis Suárez from Ajax for £22.8 million at the end of January (in the wake of Fernando Torres’s sale to Chelsea for £50 million), some journalists noted that Dalglish had begun to assert his authority at the club. Following a 1–0 victory against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge in February 2011, described by Alan Smith as “a quite brilliant display in terms of discipline and spirit” and a “defensive masterplan” by David Pleat, Henry Winter wrote, “it can only be a matter of time before he [Dalglish] is confirmed as long-term manager”.

Kenny Dalglish managing Liverpool in 2011

On 12 May 2011, Liverpool announced that Dalglish had been given a three-year contract. His first official match in charge was 2–0 defeat to Harry Redknapp’s Spurs at Anfield. Dalglish’s second stint in charge at Anfield proved controversial at times. The Scot defended Luis Suárez in the wake of the striker’s eight-match ban for racially abusing Manchester United defender Patrice Evra when the teams met in October 2011. After the Uruguayan’s apparent refusal to shake Evra’s hand in the return fixture in February 2012, an apology from both player and manager came only after the intervention of the owners.

In February 2012, Dalglish led Liverpool to their first trophy in six years, with victory in the 2011–12 Football League Cup.[80] In the same season he also led Liverpool to the 2012 FA Cup Final where they lost 2–1 to Chelsea. Despite the success in domestic cups, Liverpool finished eighth in the league, their worst showing in the league since 1994, failing to qualify for Europe’s Champions League for a third straight season. Following the end of the season, Liverpool dismissed Dalglish on 16 May 2012.

In October 2013, Dalglish returned to Liverpool as a non-executive director.

On 13 October 2017, Anfield’s Centenary Stand was officially renamed the Kenny Dalglish Stand in recognition of his unique contribution to the club.

Personal Life

Dalglish has been married to Marina since 26 November 1974. The couple have four children, Kelly, Paul, Lynsey and Lauren. Kelly has worked as a football presenter for BBC Radio 5 Live and Sky Sports.[86] Paul followed in his father’s footsteps as a footballer, playing in the Premier League and Scottish Premiership before traveling to the United States to play for the Houston Dynamo in Major League Soccer. He retired in 2008 and became a coach, spending time as head coach of Ottawa Fury FC and Miami FC in the second-division leagues of North America. Dalglish’s wife Marina was diagnosed with breast cancer in March 2003, but was treated at Aintree University Hospital in Liverpool and recovered. She later launched a charity to fund new cancer treatment equipment for UK hospitals.

Dalglish was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 1985 New Year Honours for services to football. He was appointed a Knight Bachelor in the 2018 Birthday Honours for services to football, charity and the City of Liverpool.

Dalglish in 2010

Charitable Work

In 2004, Dalglish and his wife founded the charity The Marina Dalglish Appeal to raise money to help treat cancer. Dalglish has participated in a number of events to raise money for the charity, including a replay of the 1986 FA Cup Final. In June 2007 a Centre for Oncology at Aintree University Hospital was opened, after the charity had raised £1.5 million. Dalglish often competes in the annual Gary Player Invitational Tournament, a charity golfing event which raises money for children’s causes around the world. On 1 July 2011, Dalglish was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Ulster, for services to football and charity.

Career Statistics

Club

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition

International Appearances

International Goals

Scores and results list Scotland’s goal tally first.

Managerial Record

Managerial record by team and tenure

Honours

Playing

Celtic

  • Scottish Division One/Premier Division: 1971–72, 1972–73, 1973–74, 1976–77
  • Scottish Cup: 1971–72, 1973–74, 1974–75, 1976–77
  • Scottish League Cup: 1974–75

Liverpool

  • Football League First Division: 1978–79, 1979–80, 1981–82, 1982–83, 1983–84, 1985–86
  • FA Cup: 1985–86
  • Football League Cup: 1980–81, 1981–82, 1982–83, 1983–84
  • FA Charity Shield: 1977 (shared), 1979, 1980, 1982, 1986 (shared)
  • European Cup: 1977–78, 1980–81, 1983–84
  • European Super Cup: 1977

Individual

  • Ballon d’Or runner-up: 1983
  • IOC European Footballer of the Season: 1977–78
  • PFA Players’ Player of the Year: 1982–83
  • FWA Footballer of the Year: 1978–79, 1982–83
  • English Football Hall of Fame (Player): 2002
  • Scottish Football Hall of Fame: 2004
  • FIFA 100: 2004
  • European Hall of Fame (Player): 2008

Manager

Liverpool

  • Football League First Division: 1985–86, 1987–88, 1989–90
  • FA Cup: 1985–86, 1988–89
  • Football League Cup: 2011–12
  • Football League Super Cup: 1986–87
  • FA Charity Shield: 1986 (shared), 1988, 1989 1990 (shared)

Blackburn Rovers

  • Premier League: 1994–95
  • Football League Second Division play-offs: 1992

Celtic

  • Scottish League Cup: 1999–2000

Individual

  • FWA Tribute Award: 1987
  • Premier League Manager of the Season: 1994–95
  • Premier League Manager of the Month: January 1994, November 1994

Orders

  • Member of the Order of the British Empire: 1985
  • Knight Bachelor: 2018

Kenny Dalglish – Manager Profile

Profile

Kenny Dalglish’s Liverpool love affair first began in August 1966 when a 15-year-old Glaswegian travelled south of the border for a trial at Anfield in front of the legendary Bill Shankly.

Although the young forward’s first journey to Merseyside came to nothing, 11 years and 167 Celtic goals later, he was finally recruited by the Reds to replace a club legend in the form of the departing Kevin Keegan.

Dalglish slipped seamlessly into Paisley’s all-conquering red machine and the new King of the Kop crowned his first season by topping the club’s goalscoring charts and netting the winner in a European Cup final.

But that proved to be just the start of an incredible playing career that would make him an Anfield icon.

With the ball at his feet, he was a pure genius – a contention backed up by footage of just about every one of his 172 Liverpool goals. Everyone has their own particular favourite but the one common denominator in all the above was the famous Kenny celebration: a quick turn with arms aloft and a beaming smile as wide as the Mersey.

As Dalglish neared the end of his playing days, it appeared impossible for the Scot to improve his standing among Kopites. But that he went on to do, just two spells as manager says all you need to know about the man they still call King Kenny.

His impact on the playing field had been nothing short of sensational but, in the aftermath of the Heysel Stadium tragedy, the club hoped he could reproduce his genius in the dugout.

It was a big ask for someone who was just 34 years old, but then Dalglish was not your average man.

That said, the Scot’s first campaign got off to an inauspicious start and, after a 2-0 defeat to Everton at Anfield in late February, the Reds were left eight points behind the league-leading Toffees with as many games to go.

But a team hewn in Dalglish’s image did not give up easily, and embarked on a remarkable unbeaten run to end the season as league champions and FA Cup winners, with both victories coming at the expense of their neighbours.

King Kenny built on that success by assembling one of the most entertaining teams ever to grace Anfield, with two further league titles and another FA Cup subsequently added to his honours list before he stepped down in 1991. A second spell between 2011 and 2012 also brought the League Cup winner’s medal that had previously eluded him as a boss.

Regardless of his footballing achievements, it is arguably Dalglish’s dignified conduct in the aftermath of the Hillsborough Disaster that is his greatest legacy and sees him widely regarded as a legend of the city of Liverpool, not just the club that bears its name.

Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish through the years: In Pictures

The early years: Kenny Dalglish arrived at Anfield from Celtic in August 1977 after Bob Paisley paid £440,000 for the Scot. The forward won four league titles and four Scottish Cups during his time at Celtic. Picture: GETTY IMAGES
Little boots to fill: Dalglish joined Liverpool as a replacement for Kevin Keegan (left) who left for Hamburg. Picture: PA
Dream start: a week after making his debut against Manchester United in the Charity Shield at Wembley Stadium, Dalglish took just seven minutes before scoring in his league debut against Middlesbrough. Picture: GETTY IMAGES
This glittering prize: Dalglish scored the only goal of the game in the 1978 European Cup final at Wembley as Bob Paisley’s Liverpool side retained their title following their 1-0 defeat of Belgium’s Club Bruges. Picture: PA
International honours: the Scot earned 102 international caps during which time he scored 30 goals. Picture: GETTY IMAGES
Paris match: Dalglish picked up a second European Cup in 1981 after Liverpool beat Real Madrid in Paris. Picture: GHETTY IMAGES
Familiar sight: Dalglish won five titles during his playing career at Anfield – in 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984. Picture: REX FEATURES
Leading by example: after taking over from Joe Fagan following the Heysel disaster he led Liverpool to the Double in 1986 and scored the goal to clinch their 16th league title against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. Picture: PA
Worth the wait: Liverpool won the FA Cup after beating Everton 3-1. The club hadn’t won the Cup since 1974. Picture: GETTY IMAGES
Centre stage: Tommy Docherty (left) and Alex Ferguson (right) turned out for Dalglish’s testimonal at Hampden Park in 1986. Picture: REX FEATURES
Darkest hour: Dalglish was managing Liverpool when disaster struck at Hillsborough in April 1989. Picture: GETTY IMAGES
Unconditional support: both Dalglish and his wife, Marina (left), attended many of the funerals following the tragedy that saw 96 Liverpool supporters killed in the Leppings Lane end of Sheffield Wednesday’s ground. Picture: PA

Anfield

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

View from the Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand
Liverpool FC Anfield Stadium 3D Puzzle

Anfield is a football stadium in Anfield, Liverpool, Merseyside, England, which has a seating capacity of 54,074, making it the seventh largest football stadium in England. It has been the home of Liverpool FC since their formation in 1892. It was originally the home of Everton FC from 1884 to 1891, before they moved to Goodison Park after a dispute with the club president.

The stadium has four stands:

  • The Spion Kop
  • The Main Stand
  • The Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand
  • The Anfield Road End

The record attendance of 61,905 was set at a match between Liverpool and Wolverhampton Wanderers in 1952. The ground converted to an all-seater stadium in 1994 as a result of the Taylor Report, which reduced its capacity.

Two gates at the stadium are named after former Liverpool managers: Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley. A statue of Shankly is also outside the stadium. The ground is 2 miles (3 km) from Liverpool Lime Street railway station. It was proposed in 2002 to replace the stadium with a new one in the adjacent Stanley Park, but after the acquisition of Liverpool F.C. by Fenway Sports Group in 2010 it was made clear this would not happen.

Construction for an extension to the Main Stand began on 8 December 2014. This extension which opened to the public on 9 September 2016 increased the stadium capacity to 54,074, making it one of the largest all-seater single stands in European football. There are future plans to expand the Anfield Road Stand which would bring the stadium size to around 61,000.

History

The topmast rescued from the SS Great Eastern

The name Anfield comes from the old town land of “Annefield” outside New Ross, County Wexford in Ireland.

Opened in 1884, Anfield was originally owned by John Orrell, a minor land owner who was a friend of Everton F.C. member John Houlding. Everton, who previously played at Priory Road, were in need of a new venue owing to the noise produced by the crowd on match days. Orrell lent the pitch to the club in exchange for a small rent. The first match at the ground was between Everton and Earlestown on 28 September 1884, which Everton won 5–0. During Everton’s tenure at the stadium, stands were erected for some of the 8,000-plus spectators regularly attending matches, although the ground was capable of holding around 20,000 spectators and occasionally did. The ground was considered of international standard at the time, playing host to the British Home Championship match between England and Ireland in 1889. Anfield’s first league match was played on 8 September 1888, between Everton and Accrington F.C. Everton quickly improved as a team, and became Anfield’s first league champions in the 1890–91 season.

In 1892, negotiations to purchase the land at Anfield from Orrell escalated into a dispute between Houlding and the Everton F.C. committee over how the club was run. Events culminated in Everton’s move to Goodison Park. Houlding was left with an empty stadium, and decided to form a new club to occupy it. The new team was called Liverpool F.C. and Athletic Grounds Ltd, and the club’s first match at Anfield was a friendly played in front of 200 people on 1 September 1892, against Rotherham Town. Liverpool won 7–1.

Liverpool’s first Football League match at Anfield was played on 9 September 1893, against Lincoln City. Liverpool won 4–0 in front of 5,000 spectators. A new stand capable of holding 3,000 spectators was constructed in 1895 on the site of the present Main Stand. Designed by architect Archibald Leitch, the stand had a distinctive red and white gable, and was similar to the main stand at Newcastle United’s ground St James’ Park. Another stand was constructed at the Anfield Road end in 1903, built from timber and corrugated iron. After Liverpool had won their second League championship in 1906, a new stand was built along the Walton Breck Road. Local journalist Ernest Edwards, who was the sports editor of newspapers the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo, named it the Spion Kop; it was named after a famous hill in South Africa where a local regiment had suffered heavy losses during the Boer War in 1900. More than 300 men had died, many of them from Liverpool, as the British army attempted to capture the strategic hilltop. Around the same period a stand was also built along Kemlyn Road.

The ground remained much the same until 1928, when the Kop was redesigned and extended to hold 30,000 spectators, all standing. A roof was erected as well. Many stadia in England had stands named after the Spion Kop. Anfield’s was the largest Kop in the country at the time—it was able to hold more supporters than some entire football grounds. In the same year the topmast of the SS Great Eastern, one of the first iron ships, was rescued from the ship breaking yard at nearby Rock Ferry, and was hauled up Everton Valley by a team of horses, to be erected alongside the new Kop. It still stands there, serving as a flag pole.

The Kop in 1983, before the Taylor Report recommended standing areas in football grounds be outlawed following the Hillsborough disaster in 1989.

Floodlights were installed at a cost of £12,000 in 1957. On 30 October they were switched on for the first time for a match against Everton to commemorate the 75-year anniversary of the Liverpool County Football Association. In 1963 the old Kemlyn Road stand was replaced by a cantilevered stand, built at a cost of £350,000, accommodating 6,700 spectators. Two years later alterations were made at the Anfield Road end, turning it into a larger covered standing area with refreshments under the structure. The biggest redevelopment came in 1973, when the old Main Stand was partially demolished and extended backwards with new roof. Simultaneously the concrete pylon floodlights were demolished with new lights installed along the rooflines of the Kemlyn Road and Main Stands. The new stand was officially opened by the Duke of Kent on 10 March 1973. In the 1980s the paddock in front of the Main Stand was turned into seating, and in 1982 seats were introduced at the Anfield Road end. The Shankly Gates were erected in 1982, a tribute to former manager Bill Shankly; his widow Nessie unlocked them for the first time on 26 August 1982. Across the Shankly Gates are the words You’ll Never Walk Alone, the title of the hit song by Gerry and the Pacemakers adopted by Liverpool fans as the club’s anthem during Shankly’s time as manager.

Coloured seats and a police room were added to the Kemlyn Road stand in 1987. After the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 when Police mismanagement led to overcrowding and the deaths of 96 Liverpool fans, the Taylor Report recommended that all grounds in the country should be converted into all-seater grounds by May 1994. A second tier was added to the Kemlyn Road stand in 1992, turning it into a double-decker layout. It included executive boxes and function suites as well as 11,000 seating spaces. Plans to expand the stand had been made earlier, with the club buying up houses on Kemlyn Road during the 1970s, and 1980s, but had to be put on hold until 1990 because two sisters, Joan and Nora Mason, refused to sell their house. When the club reached an agreement with the sisters in 1990, the expansion plans were put into action. The stand—renamed the Centenary Stand—was officially opened on 1 September 1992 by UEFA president Lennart Johansson. The Kop was rebuilt in 1994 after the recommendations of the Taylor Report and became all seated; it is still a single tier, and the capacity was significantly reduced to 12,390.

The Shankly Gates were erected in 1982

On 4 December 1997, a bronze statue of Bill Shankly was unveiled at the visitors’ centre in front of the Kop. Standing at over 8 feet (2.4 m) tall, the statue depicts Shankly with a fan’s scarf around his neck, in a familiar pose he adopted when receiving applause from fans. Inscribed on the statue are the words “Bill Shankly – He Made The People Happy”. The Hillsborough memorial is situated alongside the Shankly Gates, and is always decorated with flowers and tributes to the 96 people who died in 1989 as a result of the disaster. At the centre of the memorial is an eternal flame, signifying that those who died will never be forgotten. Since 2014, the memorial was temporarily removed during the expansion of the Main Stand of the stadium.

In 1998 a new two-tier Anfield Road end was opened. The stand has encountered a number of problems since its redevelopment; at the beginning of the 1999–2000 season, a series of support poles and stanchions had to be brought in to give extra stability to the top tier of the stand. During Ronnie Moran’s testimonial match against Celtic, many fans complained of movement of the top tier. At the same time that the stanchions were inserted, the executive seating area was expanded by two rows in the main stand, lowering the seating capacity in the paddock.

Structures and Facilities

Outline of Anfield pre-2015 redevelopment; The Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand (top), The Kop (right), Main Stand (bottom) and Anfield Road stand (left)

Anfield comprises 54,074 seats split between four stands: the Anfield Road end, the Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand, the Kop, and the Main Stand. The Anfield Road end and Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand are two-tiered, while the Kop is single-tiered and the Main Stand three-tiered. Entry to the stadium is gained by radio-frequency identification (RFID) smart cards rather than the traditional manned turnstile. This system, used in all 80 turnstiles around Anfield, was introduced in 2005.

Plans to replace Anfield with a new 60,000-capacity stadium in adjacent Stanley Park were initiated in 2002. The plans were revisited under the ownership of Tom Hicks and George Gillett.Following the acquisition of Liverpool F.C. by Fenway Sports Group in 2010, the owners have abandoned the proposed new stadium in Stanley Park, preferring instead to redevelop and expand Anfield, thus echoing their decision to renovate Fenway Park. The Kop is a large single-tiered stand. Originally a large terraced banking providing accommodation for more than 30,000 spectators, the current incarnation was constructed in 1994–95 and is single-tiered with no executive boxes. The Kop houses the club’s museum, the Reducate centre and the official club shop. The Kop is the most-renowned stand at Anfield among home and away supporters, with the people who occupy the stand referred to as kopites. Such was the reputation that the stand had it was claimed that the crowd in the Kop could suck the ball into the goal. Traditionally, Liverpool’s most vocal supporters congregate in this stand.

The old tunnel to the pitch at Anfield. The “This is Anfield“ sign was installed by former manager Bill Shankly to instill fear into the opposition.

The oldest stand at Anfield is the Main Stand, taking 76 years to complete. The stand was completed in 2016, however, the lower section dates from 1906. The bottom tier of the stand houses the directors’ box. The directors’ VIP box is located at the rear of the lower tier of the stand. The old large roof was supported by two thin central uprights, with a large suspended television camera gantry which has moved to the front of the third tier The players’ tunnel and the technical area where the managers and substitutes sit during the match are in the middle of the stand at pitch level. Above the stairs leading down to the pitch hung a sign stating “THIS IS ANFIELD“. Its purpose was to both intimidate the opposition and to bring the Liverpool players who touch it good luck. Accordingly, Liverpool players and coaching staff traditionally reached up and placed one or both hands on it as they passed underneath.

The sign was temporarily removed during the most recent reconstruction of the Main Stand; it was placed at the exit from the new Main Stand tunnel to the pitch in advance of Liverpool’s 2016–17 home opener. Current Liverpool manager Jürgen Klopp had banned players from touching the restored sign until the team had won at least one major trophy. After winning the 2019 UEFA Champions League Final players are now allowed to do so again. Praising the impact the Anfield atmosphere has on the home team and the effect it has on the away team, opposition manager Pep Guardiola states, “The motto ‘This is Anfield’ is no marketing spin. There’s something about it that you will find in no other stadium in the world.”

The Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand is a two-tiered stand. Originally a single-tiered stand called the Kemlyn Road Stand, the second tier was added in 1992 to coincide with the club’s centenary. It is located opposite the Main Stand and houses directors’ boxes, which are between the two tiers. The stand also houses the ground’s police station. On 3 May 2017, Liverpool announced the Centenary Stand would be renamed the Kenny Dalglish Stand in honour of the club’s greatest servant, former player and manager Kenny Dalglish.

The Anfield Road stand, on the left side of the Main Stand, houses the away fans during matches. The Anfield Road End was rebuilt in 1965, and multi-coloured seats were added in 1982. Originally a single-tier stand, a further revamp, which was completed in 1998, gave the stand a second-tier providing additional seating.

There are 59 spaces available in the stadium to accommodate wheelchair users who have season tickets; a further 33 spaces are available for general sale and 8 are allocated to away supporters. These spaces are located in the Main Stand, Anfield Road Stand and The Kop. There are 38 spaces available for the visually impaired, which are situated in the old paddock area of the Main Stand, with space for one personal assistant each. A headset with full commentary is provided.

The stadium features tributes to two of the club’s most successful managers. The Paisley Gateway is a tribute to Bob Paisley, who guided Liverpool to three European Cups and six League Championships in the 1970s, and 1980s. The gates were erected at the Kop; their design includes representations of the three European Cups Paisley won during his tenure, the crest of his birthplace in Hetton-le-Hole, and the crest of Liverpool F.C. The Shankly Gates, in tribute of Bill Shankly, Paisley’s predecessor between 1959 and 1974, are at the Anfield Road end. Their design includes a Scottish flag, a Scottish thistle, the Liverpool badge, and the words “You’ll Never Walk Alone”.

Anfield stadium is a UEFA category 4 stadium.

A panorama of Anfield from the Anfield Road Stand, showing from left to right the Sir Kenny Dalglish Stand, the Kop Stand and the former Main Stand in 2012

Redevelopment

Abandoned New Stadium Plans

The Kop; the atmosphere generated by the crowd in the stand led owner John W. Henry to reconsider the construction of a new stadium.

Plans to replace Anfield were originally initiated by Liverpool F.C. in May 2002. The proposed capacity was 55,000, but it was later revised to 61,000, with 1,000 seats given for segregation between home and away fans. Several attempts were made between 2003 and 2007 by the Liverpool City Council to instigate a groundshare of the proposed stadium with local rivals Everton, but this move was rejected, as neither club favoured it. On 30 July 2004 Liverpool was granted planning permission to build a new stadium 300 yards (270 m) away from Anfield at Stanley Park. On 8 September 2006 Liverpool City Council agreed to grant Liverpool F.C. a 999-year lease of the land on the proposed site.

Following the takeover of Liverpool F.C. on 6 February 2007 by George Gillett and Tom Hicks, the proposed stadium was redesigned. In November 2007 the redesigned layout was approved by the council, and construction was due to start in early 2008. The new stadium, provisionally called Stanley Park Stadium, was to be built by HKS, Inc.. It was scheduled to open in August 2011 with a capacity of 60,000. If the new stadium had been built, Anfield would have been demolished. The land would have become home to the centrepiece for the Anfield Plaza development, which would have included a hotel, restaurants, and offices. However, the construction of Stanley Park was delayed following the economic crisis of 2008 and the subsequent recession, which directly affected the then American owners. The situation was worsened because the club was bought with borrowed money, not the owners’ capital, and interest rates were higher than expected. Hicks and Gillett promised to begin work on the stadium within 60 days of acquisition of the club, but had trouble financing the estimated £500 million needed for the Stanley Park development. The deadline passed and the plan was eventually cancelled by the Fenway Sports Group, as their preference was to re-develop Anfield.

Anfield Redevelopment

The Main Stand redevelopment in March 2016

The acquisition of Liverpool F.C. by Fenway Sports Group in October 2010 put into question whether Liverpool would leave Anfield. In February 2011 the new club owner, John W. Henry, stated he had a preference for remaining at Anfield and expanding the capacity. After attending a number of games at Anfield, Henry stated that “the Kop is unrivalled”, adding “it would be hard to replicate that feeling anywhere else”. On 15 October 2012, Liverpool City Council announced plans to regenerate the Anfield area after securing a £25m grant, with a housing association also set to invest.

On 23 August 2013 Anfield was listed as an Asset of Community Value by Liverpool City Council.[61] On 11 September, current owner, John W. Henry announced that they had the funds to afford the expansion but they are waiting for the City Council to finalise the purchase of houses in the area before they commit to plans to expand the Main Stand and the Anfield Road end of the ground. In April 2014 Liverpool F.C. signed a legal agreement with Liverpool City Council and Your Housing Group to redevelop the surrounding Anfield area. This was seen as a significant step towards the renovation of the stadium. The redevelopment was worth around £260 million.

Phase One (2015–16): Main Stand Redevelopment

On 23 April 2014, Liverpool F.C. revealed plans for an expansion of the Main Stand, which involved adding new third tier, new matchday facilities and enhanced corporate facilities. The new stand would add 8,500 seats and take the capacity of the stadium to 54,742. Work began on 8 December 2014, with the club aiming for the new stand to be match-ready and operational for the start of the 2016–17 season. The work was undertaken by Carillion.The structure of new stand was uniquely constructed around the existing main stand to enable the existing stand to continue to be used at full operational capacity during the 2015–16 season. Demolition of the existing stand took place in summer 2016, allowing for the construction of the lower tiers of the new stand during the off-season. Consisting of 1.8 million bricks and blocks and over 5000 tonnes of steel, the stand was opened on schedule on 9 September 2016 for the first home game of the 2016–17 season, a 4–1 victory over Leicester City. Further internal construction work including new changing rooms and media facilities continued until April 2017.

New Club Superstore and Matchday Experience Enhancements (2016–17)

In May 2016, outline planning permission was granted by Liverpool council for the construction of a new 1,800 sq m club superstore development, situated on Walton Breck Road on the corner of the Kop and the new Main Stand. Construction began in December 2016, with the store opening early in the 2017–18 season. The space between the new store and the stadium was developed into a “fan zone”, with new catering outlets and pre-match entertainment.

Proposed Phase Two: Anfield Road Redevelopment

The second phase of Anfield’s redevelopment is to redevelop the Anfield Road stand. The club received initial outline planning permission in 2014 for the redevelopment, with seating to be increased by 4,825, giving Anfield a total capacity of 58,000. However, it has since been reported that the club are looking to increase capacity further to “above 60,000”, with Liverpool FC chief operating officer Andy Hughes stating that “one of our main objectives is to maximize capacity in this design”.

As of 2018, the club are conducting feasibility studies and detailed planning work into a new stand, with a view to making a decision on the proposed redevelopment in the near future. Initial outline planning permission expires in September 2019, although changes in design means plans may have to be resubmitted for approval.

Other Uses

Anfield has hosted numerous international matches, and was one of the venues used during UEFA Euro 1996; the ground hosted three group games and a quarter-final. The first international match hosted at Anfield was between England and Ireland, in 1889. England won the match 6–1. Anfield was also the home venue for several of England’s international football matches in the early 1900s, and for the Welsh national team in the later part of that century. Anfield has also played host to five FA Cup semi-finals, the last of which was in 1929. The most recent international to be hosted at Anfield was England’s 2–1 victory over Uruguay on 1 March 2006. England has played two testimonial matches against Liverpool at Anfield. The first was in 1983, when England faced Liverpool for Phil Thompson’s testimonial. Then, in 1988, England visited again for Alan Hansen’s testimonial. Liverpool’s arch rival Manchester United played their first home game of the 1971–72 season at Anfield as they were banned from playing their first two home league matches at Old Trafford after an incident of hooliganism. United beat Arsenal 3–1.

Rugby League

The stadium has hosted five rugby league matches: the 1989 Charity Shield between Widnes and Wigan; the 1991 World Club Challenge between Wigan, winners of the RFL Championship, and Penrith Panthers, winners of the Australian NSWRL Premiership, with an attendance of 20,152; a 1997 St. Helens Super League home game against Castleford Tigers, with an attendance of 12,329; and the 2016 Rugby League Four Nations Final, in front of 40,042 people.

Super League

Anfield was chosen as the venue for the 2019 Magic Weekend after two test matches were played there in 2016 and 2018. After previously choosing games that were local derbies or competitive games, in 2019 the fixtures were determined by the previous seasons league position.

Robert Elstone, Super League Chief Executive, said “On behalf of the Super League clubs, we’re delighted to be taking the Dacia Magic Weekend to one of the most famous stadiums in the world.

World Club Challenge

Charity Shield

Rugby LeagueTest Matches

Anfield has been the venue for many other events. During the mid-twenties, Anfield was the finishing line for the city marathon. Liverpool held an annual race which started from St George’s plateau in the city centre and finished with a lap of Anfield. Boxing matches were regularly held at Anfield during the inter-war years, including a number of British boxing championships; on 12 June 1934 Nel Tarleton beat Freddie Miller for the World Featherweight title. Professional tennis was played at Anfield on boards on the pitch. US Open champion, Bill Tilden, and Wimbledon champion, Fred Perry, entertained the crowds in an exhibition match. In 1958, an exhibition basketball match featuring the Harlem Globetrotters was held at the ground.

Non Sporting Events

Aside from sporting uses, Anfield has been a venue for musicians of different genres as well as evangelical preachers. One week in July 1984, the American evangelist Billy Graham preached at Anfield, attracting crowds of over 30,000 each night. Anfield was featured in Liverpool’s 2008 European Capital of Culture celebrations: 36,000 people attended a concert on 1 June 2008, featuring The Zutons, Kaiser Chiefs, and Paul McCartney. Live concerts made a return to Anfield in the Summer of 2019, with Take That, Bon Jovi and Pink performing. Take That lead singer Gary Barlow, a Liverpool fan, brought out a guest vocalist, Gerry Marsden, and they sang the club’s anthem “You’ll Never Walk Alone”.

Records

The average attendance at Anfield from 1946–2007

The highest attendance recorded at Anfield is 61,905, for Liverpool’s match against Wolverhampton Wanderers in the FA Cup fifth round, on 2 February 1952. The lowest attendance recorded at Anfield was 1,000 for a match against Loughborough on 7 December 1895. The highest average attendance of 53,112 was set for the 2016–17 season.

Liverpool did not lose a match at Anfield during the 1893–94, 1970–71, 1976–77, 1978–79, 1979–80, 1987–88, 2008–09, 2017–18 and 2018–19 seasons. They won all their home games during the 1893–94 season. Liverpool’s longest unbeaten streak at home extended from January 1978 to January 1981, a period encompassing 85 games, in which Liverpool scored 212 goals and conceded 35. Liverpool’s worst losing streak at Anfield is three games. This has occurred three times in the club’s history to date (1899–1900, 1906–07 and 1908–09 seasons).

Transport

The stadium is about 2 miles (3 km) from Lime Street Station, which lies on a branch of the West Coast Main Line from London Euston. Kirkdale Station, about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the stadium, is the nearest station to Anfield. Fans travelling by train for matches may book direct to Anfield or Goodison Park, changing to the Peoplesbus Soccerbus service at Sandhills Station on the Merseyrail Northern Line. The stadium has no parking facilities for supporters, and the streets around the ground allow parking only for residents with permits, although there are a small number of passes that can be allocated to over-65s. There are proposals under consideration for reinstating passenger traffic on the Bootle Branch, which would cut the distance from the nearest railway station to about 0.5 miles (1 km).

Sepp van den Berg

Personal Detail

Sepp van den Berg was Liverpool’s first signing since being crowned champions of Europe for the sixth time.

The Reds announced they had agreed a deal to sign the highly-rated 17-year-old defender from PEC Zwolle on June 27, 2019.

A Netherlands U19s international, Van den Berg is known to be a strong and determined centre-half, who is more than comfortable with the ball at his feet.

The teenager progressed from the youth ranks at PEC Zwolle through to its first team and, in September 2018, broke Clarence Seedorf’s record to become the youngest ever player to make at least 10 Eredivisie appearances.

Van den Berg made his senior debut at the age of 16 years and 81 days when he came on as a substitute against FC Groningen on March 11, 2018, and would be in the starting XI for five matches before that season’s end.

He established himself further in the Dutch top flight during the 2018-19 campaign, making 15 league appearances, 10 of which were starts.

After becoming Liverpool’s first acquisition of the 2019 summer, Van den Berg was excited to continue his development on Merseyside.

“I think this is the best place for me to grow and hopefully play a lot of games here,” he said after penning his long-term contract.