Tag Archives: Actor

Antonio Banderas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

José Antonio Domínguez Bandera (born 10 August 1960) is a Spanish actor, director, singer, and producer. He began his acting career with a series of films by director Pedro Almodóvar and then appeared in high-profile Hollywood movies, especially in the 1990s, including Assassins, Evita, Interview with the Vampire, Philadelphia, Desperado, The Mask of Zorro, Take the Lead, The Expendables 3 and Spy Kids. Banderas also portrayed the voice of “Puss in Boots” in the Shrek sequels and Puss in Boots as well as the bee in the US Nasonex commercials.

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Contents
1 Early life
2 Career
2.1 Early work, 1982–1990
2.2 Breakthrough, 1991–1994
2.3 Worldwide recognition, 1995–present
3 Business activities
4 Personal life
5 Filmography
6 Theatre

Early Life


José Antonio Domínguez Bandera was born on 10 August 1960, in the Andalusian city of Málaga, to José Domínguez Prieto (1920-2008), a police officer in the Civil Guard, and Ana Bandera Gallego (1933-2017), a school teacher. He has a brother, Francisco Javier. Although his father’s family name is Domínguez, he took his mother’s last name as his stage name. As a child, he wanted to become a professional soccer player until a broken foot sidelined his dreams at the age of fourteen. He showed a strong interest in the performing arts and formed part of the ARA Theatre-School run by Ángeles Rubio-Argüelles y Alessandri (wife of diplomat, writer and film director Edgar Neville) and the College of Dramatic Art, both in Málaga. His work in the theater, and his performances on the streets, eventually landed him a spot with the Spanish National Theatre.

Career


Early work, 1982–1990

Banderas began working in small shops during Spain’s post-dictatorial cultural movement known as the La Movida Madrileña. While performing with the theatre, Banderas caught the attention of Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar, who cast the young actor in his 1982 movie debut Labyrinth of Passion. Five years later, he went on to appear in the director’s Law of Desire, making headlines with his performance as a gay man, which required him to engage in his first male-to-male onscreen kiss. After Banderas appeared in Almodóvar’s 1986 Matador, the director cast him in his internationally acclaimed 1988 film, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. The recognition Banderas gained for his role increased two years later when he starred in Almodóvar’s controversial Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! as a mental patient who kidnaps a porn star (Victoria Abril) and keeps her tied up until she returns his love. It was his breakthrough role in Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!, that helped spur him on to Hollywood. Almodóvar is credited for helping launch Banderas’s international career, as he became a regular feature in his movies throughout the 1980s.

Breakthrough, 1991–1994

In 1991, Madonna introduced Banderas to Hollywood. The following year, still speaking minimal English, he began acting in U.S. films. Despite having to learn all his lines phonetically, Banderas still managed to turn in a critically praised performance as a struggling musician in his first American drama film, The Mambo Kings (1992).

Banderas then broke through to mainstream American audiences in the film Philadelphia (1993), as the lover of AIDS-afflicted lawyer Andrew Beckett (Tom Hanks). The film’s success earned Banderas wide recognition, and the following year he was given a role in Neil Jordan’s high-profile adaptation of Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire, sharing the screen with Brad Pitt.

Worldwide recognition, 1995–present

He appeared in several major Hollywood releases in 1995, including a starring role in the Robert Rodriguez-directed film Desperado and the antagonist on the action film Assassins, co-starred with Sylvester Stallone. In 1996, he starred alongside Madonna in Evita, an adaptation of the musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice in which he played the narrator, Che, a role played by David Essex in the original 1978 West End production. He also made success with his role as the legendary masked swordsman Zorro in the 1998 film The Mask of Zorro. In 1999 he starred in The 13th Warrior, a movie about a Muslim caught up in a war between the Northman and human eating beasts.

In 2001, he collaborated with Robert Rodriguez who cast him in the Spy Kids film trilogy. He also starred in Michael Cristofer’s Original Sin alongside Angelina Jolie the same year. In 2002, he starred in Brian De Palma’s Femme Fatale opposite Rebecca Romijn and in Julie Taymor’s Frida with Salma Hayek. In 2003, he starred in the last installment of the trilogy Once Upon A Time in Mexico (in which he appeared with Johnny Depp and Hayek). Banderas’ debut as a director was the poorly received Crazy in Alabama (1999), starring his then wife Melanie Griffith.

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Banderas in June 2007

In 2003, he returned to the musical genre, appearing to great acclaim in the Broadway revival of Maury Yeston’s musical Nine, based on the film 8½, playing the prime role originated by Raúl Juliá. Banderas won both the Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk awards, and was nominated for the Tony Award for best actor in a musical. His performance is preserved on the Broadway cast recording released by PS Classics. Later that year, he received the Rita Moreno HOLA Award for Excellence from the Hispanic Organization of Latin Actors (HOLA).

Banderas’ voice role as “Puss in Boots” in Shrek 2, Shrek the Third, and the last film in the Shrek franchise, Shrek Forever After, helped make the character popular on the family film circuit. In 2005, he reprised his role as Zorro in The Legend of Zorro, though this was not as successful as The Mask of Zorro. In 2006, he starred in Take the Lead, a high-set movie in which he played a ballroom dancing teacher. That year, he directed his second film El camino de los ingleses, and also received the L.A. Latino International Film Festival’s “Gabi” Lifetime Achievement Award on 14 October.

He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on 6801 Hollywood Blvd. in 2005.

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Banderas pictured with the cast of The 33, on 1 August 2015

In 2011, the horror thriller The Skin I Live In marked the return of Banderas to Pedro Almodóvar, the Spanish director who launched his international career. The two had not worked together since 1990 (Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!). In The Skin I Live In he breaks out of the “Latin Lover” mold from his Hollywood work and stars as a calculating revenge-seeking plastic surgeon following the rape of his daughter. According to the Associated Press Banderas’ performance is among his strongest in recent memory. He again lent his voice to Puss in Boots, this time as the protagonist of the Shrek spin-off prequel, Puss in Boots. This film reunited Banderas with Salma Hayek for the sixth time.

Business Activities


He has invested some of his film earnings in Andalusian products, which he promotes in Spain and the US. He owns 50% of a winery in Villalba de Duero, Burgos, Spain, called Anta Banderas, which produces red and rosé wines.

He performed a voice-over for a computer-animated bee which can be seen in the United States in television commercials for Nasonex, an allergy medication, and was seen in the 2007 Christmas advertising campaign for Marks & Spencer, a British retailer.

He is a veteran of the perfume industry. The actor has been working with fragrance and beauty multinational company Puig for over ten years becoming one of the brand’s most successful representatives. Banderas and Puig have successfully promoted a number of fragrances so far – Diavolo, Diavolo for Women, Mediterraneo, Spirit, and Spirit for Women. After the success of Antonio for Men and Blue Seduction for Men in 2007, launched his latest Blue Seduction for Women the following year.

Personal Life


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Banderas with Melanie Griffith at the Shrek Forever After premiere in May 2010.

Banderas married Ana Leza in 1986 or 1988 (sources differ) and divorced in 1996. Banderas met and began a relationship with actress Melanie Griffith in 1995 while shooting Two Much. They married on 14 May 1996 in London. They have a daughter, Stella del Carmen Bandera (born 24 September 1996), who appeared onscreen with Griffith in Banderas’ directorial debut, Crazy in Alabama (1999). In 2002, the couple received the Stella Adler Angel Award for their extensive philanthropy. Griffith has a tattoo of Banderas’ name on her right arm.

In 1996, Banderas appeared among other figures of Spanish culture in a video supporting the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party lists in the general election. He has a daughter, Ariely Garcia Banderas, with Sonnia Gomez.

A longtime supporter of Málaga CF, he is also an officer (mayordomo de trono) of a Roman Catholic religious brotherhood in Málaga and travels during Holy Week to take part in the processions, although in an interview with People magazine, Banderas had once described himself as an agnostic.

In 2009, Banderas went under surgery for a benign tumor in his back.

In May 2010, Banderas received an honorary doctorate from the University of Málaga in the city where he was born. Banderas received an honorary degree from Dickinson College in 2000.

Banderas has always struggled with the pronunciation of certain English words, as he mentioned in a 2011 article with GQ Magazine. “The word that really gets me is animals, I just can never say it properly, whenever it is in a film I have to get it changed for a synonym.” “In Zorro I had a line changed from ‘You look like a bunch of animals’ to ‘you look like a collection of beasts’ it worked much better, so I don’t care”.

In 2013, he called on Europe and the United States to emulate Hugo Chávez in Venezuela and nationalize big corporations as a solution to the global economic crisis.

In June 2014, Griffith and Banderas released a statement announcing their intention to divorce “in a loving and friendly manner”. According to the petition filed in the Los Angeles Superior Court, the couple had “irreconcilable differences” that led to their separation. The divorce became official in December 2015.

In August 2015, Banderas enrolled in a fashion design course at Central Saint Martins.

Filmography


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Theatre


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Vincent Zhao

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Mo-Ma-A-still-from-the-Master-of-Tai-Chi

Vincent Zhao Wenzhuo (born 10 April 1972), sometimes credited as Vincent Chiu or Chiu Man-cheuk, is a Chinese actor and martial artist. Zhao is best known for playing the Chinese folk hero Wong Fei-hung in the Once Upon a Time in China film and television series.

VINCENT ZHAO

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Contents
1 Early life
2 Career
2.1 Fong Sai-yuk
2.2 Once Upon a Time in China
2.3 1997–1999
2.4 2000–2010
2.5 2011–present
3 Personal life
4 Filmography
4.1 Film
4.2 Television

Early Life


Zhao was born in Harbin, Heilongjiang, China, as the youngest of three sons. His father was a martial arts practitioner, and his mother was a professional sprinter, who broke the record for being the fastest female sprinter of Harbin. Under the instruction of his father, Zhao attended martial arts lessons at the age of eight but he never completely devoted himself to his lessons as he was more interested in singing. In the early 1980s, Zhao was sent to a martial arts academy in Harbin and began to train vigorously, where he started to love the sport. He soon became the youngest member of the Harbin wushu team, which was established in 1985. Trained in various wushu techniques, Zhao mastered t’ai chi ch’uan, especially the Chen and Yang styles.

Zhao maintained high academic standards, and in 1990, he was accepted by Beijing Sport University to study martial arts. Throughout his university career, he joined many national championships, winning first place titles and gold medals for the National Junior Championship, the National All-Around Championship, and also the National Martial Arts Championship. He was also qualified to be in China’s national martial arts team, and his classmates gave him the nickname, “Kungfu King”.

Career


Fong Sai-yuk

In 1992, Hong Kong film producer Corey Yuen went to Beijing Sport University to find a martial artist to play the role of the antagonist for his 1993 film Fong Sai-yuk. Yuen found Zhao through the latter’s instructor and was immediately impressed with Zhao. Initially, Zhao was uninterested, but Yuen insisted on offering him the role because he had “the skill and looks.” After further encouragement from peers and mentors, Zhao accepted the offer and shooting began in the same year. Zhao was often teased for looking too nice and young for the role of the villain, the Governor of Kau-man, but under the instruction of Yuen and other directors, he learned the easiest way to “look evil”. He said,

“The director told me: Chiu Man-cheuk, when you look at people, don’t look at them like how you usually do. You must look at them from the corner of your eyes with your profile facing them. That way, you will look evil.”

During filming, Zhao also enrolled in acting classes for three months. Fong Sai-yuk was released in March 1993 and became a box office hit in Hong Kong, grossing HK$30,666,842.

Once Upon a Time in China

After only a month into the filming of Fong Sai-yuk, contract problems between Tsui Hark and Jet Li caused Li to back out from the fourth installment of the Once Upon a Time in China saga. Tsui met Zhao on the set of Fong Sai-yuk and was impressed with Zhao’s performance that he quickly recruited Zhao to replace Li in playing the role of Wong Fei-hung. Tsui also encouraged Zhao to sign a three-year contract to be a full-time actor, but Zhao rejected the offer, stating that he felt that his education was more important. Zhao continued to devote himself to filming during school vacations for Green Snake (1993) and Once Upon a Time in China IV (1994). During filming for Green Snake, Zhao was hung high up in the air during a stunt with two steel wires supporting him but during an incident one of the steel wires broke and Zhao stated that if the other wire were to also break that he could have lost his life as well. Zhao was ultimately very frightened especially after filming this scene. During the filming of one of the Wong Fei Hung movies, he seriously injured his ankle to the point where it hadn’t healed until the year 2012. He stated that some of the bones in his ankle still hasn’t healed yet and that before this injury he was okay with doing the majority of his stunts even jumping from third or second story high buildings. The injury has also affected his flexibility as well.

Although Once Upon a Time in China IV grossed less in the box office than the first three installments, it was significant enough to continue the franchise with a fifth installment, Once Upon a Time in China V (1995). While shooting a scene, Zhao slipped during a fighting sequence and injured his head. He was rushed to the hospital and got stitches. He recovered quickly and shooting continued after several weeks. Once Upon a Time in China V was Zhao’s last role as Wong Fei-hung in the films, as Jet Li returned for the sixth and last installment, Once Upon a Time in China and America (1997).

Zhao continued playing Wong Fei-hung in the television drama Wong Fei Hung Series, also produced by Tsui Hark. The series was aired on ATV in Hong Kong for two years and received high ratings (although Wong Fei Hung Series: The Final Victory only had moderate ratings).

1997–1999

In 1997, Zhao signed a management contract with China Star, a Hong Kong talent agency, after which he began to work on more films, such as The Blacksheep Affair (1998), Body Weapon (1999) and Fist Power (1999–2000). Many considered him as “the next Jet Li”.

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2000–2010

Zhao’s contract with China Star ended in 1999, and he decided to turn his focus to the mainland Chinese market in hope of making more money (probably due to economic differences), working on television series and films such as The Sino-Dutch War 1661, Wind and Cloud and Seven Swordsmen. In 2006, Zhao returned to Hong Kong and began working on The Master of Tai Chi, produced by TVB.

During an interview concerning his career and the transition from movie actor to television actor. He said tactfully “at the beginning of the transition, my heart felt like it was in a uncomfortable state.”

Reviews for Zhao’s performance in television series were mixed, and many criticized him for giving up big productions and the silver screen. Zhao explained:

“I never took professional acting classes. The only thing I could do back then were sports and martial arts. In order to train myself, I must accept more television series to touch up my acting.”

While working on The Master of Tai Chi, Zhao was given a script for a new martial arts film and he accepted the lead role. Zhao signed with Hollywood agency CAA in 2006 with help from Jackie Chan. He was originally selected to play the lead villain in Rush Hour 3, but the role was eventually given to Hiroyuki Sanada. After spending one year and a half in America, Zhao returned to Beijing and went into an obvious physical breakdown. In September 2008 he returned to Beijing to prepare for his next film, True Legend. True Legend opened up to mixed reviews and was a failure at the box office. In April 2010 Zhao joined Sacrifice’s star-studded cast and was only given a minor role.

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2011–Present

Zhao starred alongside Yang Mi, Louis Fan, Xu Jiao and Dennis To in the 2012 martial arts fantasy film Wu Dang that was directed by Patrick Leung, written by Chan Khan, and action choreographed by Corey Yuen.

On 19 January 2012, in a press conference held in Beijing, it was announced that Zhao would be starring with Donnie Yen in the film Special Identity. However, on 29 February, Zhao was kicked off the set after having conflicts with Yen.

For the first time, Zhao is acting in an Indian film, Kabali, as antagonist for Indian super star Rajini Kanth.

Since March 1, 2017, Zhao is employed as Health Qigong ambassador.

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Personal Life


Zhao graduated from Beijing Sport University in 1994 and decided to remain there as a martial arts instructor. However, due to his busy filming schedule, he only taught classes for three months before resigning.

During his time at Beijing Academy, Zhao signed on for two months of dancing classes and won the National College Dance Championship Competition.

He was once linked with Anita Mui in early 1995 but the pair broke apart in 1996.

Zhao married his girlfriend Zhang Danlu whom he met in 2002 on June 2006, and their daughter, was born in September 2007. In November 2007, Zhao brought his family back to Beijing. At the airport, when interviewed, Zhao said his daughter is named “Rosita”, Chinese name “Zhao Ziyang” (赵紫阳). His daughter shares the same name as the late politician Zhao Ziyang, whose name has been a taboo subject in China since 1989. On 15 July 2011, Zhao’s wife gave birth in Hong Kong to their second son, who is named “Zilong” after the courtesy name of Zhao Yun, a famous general of the Three Kingdoms period.

Zhao also has a son from a previous relationship with a Shanghai college student studying in Canada and a reported pianist at that time. His son, named “Zhao Yuanda” (赵元达), English name “Joseph”, was born in August 2002. The reason for their break up is unknown. In 2004 Zhao Yuanda and his mother moved back to Beijing, where she opened a yoga center in the luxury apartments of Beijing Suburbs.

Filmography


Film

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Television

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Sammo Hung

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SAMMO HUNG

Sammo Hung (born 7 January 1952), also known as Hung Kam-bo (洪金寶), is a Hong Kong actor, martial artist, film producer and director, known for his work in many martial arts films and Hong Kong action cinema. He has been a fight choreographer for other actors such as Jackie Chan, King Hu and John Woo.

Hung is one of the pivotal figures who spearheaded the Hong Kong New Wave movement of the 1980s, helped reinvent the martial arts genre and started the vampire-like jiangshi genre. He is widely credited with assisting many of his compatriots, giving them their starts in the Hong Kong film industry, by casting them in the films he produced, or giving them roles in the production crew.

Jackie Chan is often addressed as “Da Goh” (Chinese: 大哥; pinyin: dà gē), meaning Big Brother. Hung was also known as “Da Goh”, until the filming of Project A, which featured both actors. As Hung was the eldest of the kung fu “brothers”, and the first to make a mark on the industry, he was given the nickname “Da Goh Da” (Chinese: 大哥大; pinyin: dà gē dà; Jyutping: daai6 go1 daai6), meaning, Big, Big Brother, or Biggest Big Brother.

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Contents
1 Early years
2 Film career
2.1 1960s and 1970s
2.2 1980s
2.3 1990s
2.3.1 Film
2.3.2 Television
2.4 2000s
2.4.1 Film
2.4.2 Television
2.5 Future
3 Filmography
4 Film production
4.1 Gar Bo Motion Picture Company
4.2 Bo Ho Film Company Ltd
4.3 D&B Films Company Ltd
4.4 Bojon Films Company Ltd
5 Personal life
6 In popular culture

Early Years


Hung’s ancestral hometown is Ningbo, Zhejiang. Born in Hong Kong, both of his parents worked as wardrobe artists in the local film industry and guardianship was thrust upon his grandparents. His grandmother was archetypal martial art actress Chin Tsi-ang and his grandfather was film director Hung Chung-Ho.

Hung joined the China Drama Academy, a Peking Opera School in Hong Kong, in 1961. He was enrolled for a period of seven years, beginning at the age of 9, after his grandparents heard about the school from their friends. The opera school was run by Master Yu Jim Yuen and as was customary for all students, Hung adopted the given name of his sifu as his family name whilst attending. Going by the name Yuen Lung, Hung became the foremost member of the Seven Little Fortunes (七小福) performing group, and would establish a friendly rivalry with one of the younger students, Yuen Lo. Yuen Lo would go on to become international superstar Jackie Chan. At the age of 14, Hung was selected by a teacher who had connections to the Hong Kong film industry to perform stunts on a movie. This brief foray into the industry piqued his interest in film and he took particular interest in the operation of film cameras. As the eldest of the troupe, Hung would give his opera school brothers pocket money from his earnings, endearing him greatly to his young friends. Shortly before leaving the Academy at the age of 16, Hung suffered an injury that left him bedridden for an extended period, during which time his weight ballooned. After finding work in the film industry as a stuntman, he was given a nickname after a well-known Chinese cartoon character, Sam-mo (三毛; Three Hairs).

Many years later, in 1988, Hung starred in Alex Law’s Painted Faces, a dramatic re-telling of his experiences at the China Drama Academy. Among the exercises featured in the film are numerous acrobatic backflips, and hours of handstands performed against a wall. Despite some of the more brutal exercises and physical punishments shown in Painted Faces, Hung and the rest of the Seven Little Fortunes consider the film a toned-down version of their actual experiences.

Film Career


1960s and 1970s

Hung appeared as a child actor in several films for Cathay Asia and Bo Bo Films during the early 1960s. His film debut was in the 1961 film Education of Love. In 1962, he made his first appearance alongside Jackie Chan in the film Big and Little Wong Tin Bar, followed by a role in The Birth of Yue Fei, in which he played the ten-year-old Yue Fei, the historical figure from the Song Dynasty who would go on to become a famous Chinese general and martyr. The majority of Hung’s performance was alongside another actor portraying Zhou Tong, Yue’s elderly military arts tutor. In 1966, at the age of just 14, Hung began working for Shaw Brothers Studio, assisting the action director Han Yingjie, on King Hu’s film Come Drink with Me. Between 1966 and 1974, Hung worked on over 30 wuxia films for Shaw Brothers, progressing through the roles of extra, stuntman, stunt co-ordinator and ultimately, action director.

In 1970, Hung began working for Raymond Chow and the Golden Harvest film company. He was initially hired to choreograph the action scenes for the very first Golden Harvest film, The Angry River (1970). His popularity soon began to grow, and due to the quality of his choreography and disciplined approach to his work, he again caught the eye of celebrated Taiwanese director, King Hu. Hung choreographed two of Hu’s films, A Touch of Zen (1971) and The Fate of Lee Khan (1973).

In the same year, Hung went to South Korea to study hapkido under master Ji Han Jae.

Also in 1973, he was seen in the Bruce Lee classic, Enter the Dragon. Hung was the Shaolin student Lee faces in the opening sequence.

In 1975, Hung appeared in The Man from Hong Kong, billed as the first Australian martial arts film.

Toward the late 1970s, Hong Kong cinema began to shift away from the Mandarin-language, epic martial art films popularised by directors such as Chang Cheh. In a series of films, Hung, along with Jackie Chan, began reinterpreting the genre by making comedic Cantonese kungfu. While these films still strongly featured martial arts, it was mixed with a liberal dose of humour.

In 1977, Hung was given his first lead role in a Golden Harvest production, in the film Shaolin Plot. His next film, released the same year, was also his directorial debut, The Iron-Fisted Monk, one of the earliest martial art comedies.

In 1978, Raymond Chow gave Hung the task of completing the fight co-ordination for the re-shoot of Game of Death, the film Bruce Lee was unable to complete before his death in 1973.

In 1979, Hung directed his second film, the comedy Enter the Fat Dragon, for H.K. Fong Ming Motion Picture Company, also playing the lead role Ah Lung; a character who idolises and impersonates Bruce Lee. Hung has impersonated Lee on film twice more – in the final fight scene against Cynthia Rothrock in Millionaire’s Express (1986), and throughout the 1990 Lau Kar Wing film Skinny Tiger, Fatty Dragon.

After Jackie Chan’s success with Drunken Master (1978), Hung was scheduled to make a similar film featuring Drunken Master’s “Beggar So” character played by Yuen Siu Tien (aka Simon Yuen). As his elder, Sammo’s films were expected to surpass Chan’s in popularity. The film was Magnificent Butcher (1979), which Hung co-directed with Yuen Woo-ping. However, during filming Yuen Siu Tien died of a heart attack. He was replaced by Fan Mei Sheng and Yuen’s absence may have led to low ticket sales.

1980s

As Hung’s fame grew, he used his newly found influence to assist his former China Drama Academy classmates, as well as the former students of “rival” school, The Spring and Autumn Drama School. Aside from regular collaborations with Chan, others such as Yuen Biao, Yuen Wah, Lam Ching-ying and Mang Hoi also began to make regular appearances in his films.

In 1978 and 1981, Hung made two films that contain fine examples of the Wing Chun style. The first, Warriors Two was the most significant role to date for South Korean super kicker Casanova Wong, who teamed up with Hung in the final fight. The second film was The Prodigal Son, in which the Wing Chun fighting was performed by Lam Ching-Ying. The release of The Prodigal Son, along with another film directed by and co-starring Hung, Knockabout (1979) also shot his fellow Opera schoolmate Yuen Biao to stardom.

Hung’s martial arts films of the 1980s helped reconfigure how martial arts were presented on screen. While the martial arts films of the 1970s generally featured highly stylised fighting sequences in period or fantasy settings, Hung’s choreography, set in modern urban areas, was more realistic and frenetic – featuring long one-on-one fight scenes. The fight sequences from several of these films, such as those in Winners and Sinners (1982) and Wheels on Meals (1985) came to define 1980s martial arts movies.

In 1983, the collaboration between the triumvirate of Hung, Jackie Chan, and Yuen Biao began with Chan’s Project A. Hung, Chan and Yuen were known as the ‘Three Dragons’ and their alliance lasted for 5 years. Although Yuen continued to appear in the films of Hung and Chan, the final film to date starring all three was 1988’s Dragons Forever.

Hung was also responsible for the Lucky Stars comedy film series in the 1980s. He directed and co-starred in the original trilogy, Winners and Sinners (1983), My Lucky Stars (1985) and Twinkle, Twinkle Lucky Stars (1985). These first three films featured Chan and Biao in supporting roles. Hung also produced and played a supporting role in the fourth film, Lucky Stars Go Places (1986), and made a cameo appearance in the sixth and final film, How to Meet the Lucky Stars (1996).

During the 1980s, Hung was instrumental in the creating the jiangshi genre—a “jiangshi” being hopping re-animated corpses – a Chinese equivalent to Western vampires. Two landmark films, Encounters of the Spooky Kind (1980) and The Dead and the Deadly (1983) featured jiangshi who move in standing jumps towards their victims, as well as Taoist priests with the ability to quell these vampires (and at times, each other) through magical spells and charms. Hung’s jiangshi films would pave the way for films such as the popular Mr. Vampire (1985), which he also produced, and its sequels. He revitalised the subgenre of female-led martial art films, producing cop films such as Yes, Madam a.k.a. Police Assassins (1985), which introduced stars Michelle Yeoh and Cynthia Rothrock.

1990s

Film

After some relatively poor performances at the domestic box-office, Hung had a dispute with studio head, Raymond Chow. Hung had produced the thriller Into the Fire (1989), but Hung felt Golden Harvest had withdrawn the film from cinemas too soon. The disagreement led to Hung parting company with Golden Harvest in 1991, after 21 years with the company.

Whilst continuing to produce films through his own company Bojon Films Company Ltd, Hung failed to equal his early successes. His fortunes improved somewhat as the helmer of Mr. Nice Guy (1997), a long-awaited reunion with Chan.

In 1994, Hung coordinated the fight sequences in Wong Kar-wai’s wuxia epic, Ashes of Time.

Television

In 1998, US television network CBS began to broadcast Martial Law (1998–2000) on Saturday nights, an action-drama built around Hung. The hour-long shows were a surprise success and installed Hung as the only East Asian headlining a prime time network series. The television series was executive produced and occasionally directed by Stanley Tong, and co-starred Arsenio Hall. Hung reportedly recited some of his English dialogue phonetically.

2000s

Film

During 2000–2001, Hung expressed interest in creating a film adaptation of the video game Soulcalibur. The production agreement for the film was made around April 2001 with an estimated budget of $50 million. Hung had the idea of producing a martial arts epic with Chen Lung Jackie Chan in the lead role, but the film was never made. Hung’s plans were detailed on his website, but after a year the announcement was removed. The film rights have since been acquired by Warren Zide, the producer of American Pie and Final Destination.

Hung found renewed success in Hong Kong film industry in the 2000s, beginning with The Legend of Zu (2001), the long-awaited sequel to the 1983 hit Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain. In 2004, Stephen Chow’s Kung Fu Hustle was released. Though Yuen Woo-ping was credited for the martial arts choreography on Kung Fu Hustle, Hung actually did the preliminary work but left the film midway through, and Yuen filled in to complete it. Because of his departure from the film, there was tabloid speculation that he and Chow had strong differences over the film, resulting in their separation. Chow has since responded that Hung left for personal reasons and not because of speculated tensions. In 2004, Hung again worked with Jackie Chan, in a brief but notable appearance in Disney’s Around the World in 80 Days as the legendary folk hero Wong Fei Hung, a character played by Chan in the Drunken Master series.

In 2005, Hung was involved in Daniel Lee’s Dragon Squad and Wilson Yip’s SPL: Sha Po Lang (aka Kill Zone). In the latter, Hung played a villain for the first time in over 25 years, and had his first ever fight scene against Donnie Yen. One of the key relationships in SPL had been Hung’s role as the adoptive father of Wu Jing’s character. However, these scenes were dropped from the final film as the director couldn’t find a way to fit them into the film. In response to this, a prequel film was planned. Hung appeared alongside Wu Jing again in 2007’s Twins Mission with stars, the Twins. In early 2008, Hung starred in Fatal Move, in which he and Ken Lo played a pair of rival triad gang leaders. He also starred in, and performed action choreography for, Daniel Lee’s Three Kingdoms: Resurrection of the Dragon, with Andy Lau and Maggie Q. The film, was based on the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms.

Antony Szeto’s film, Wushu, which stars Hung premiered in Beijing in October 2008. The film was unveiled by Golden Network at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. Jackie Chan was the film’s executive producer, and worked on the film in an advisory capacity, assisting with marketing and casting. Hung then worked again with director Wilson Yip and star Donnie Yen, as the action director for the 2008 film Ip Man.

In 2010, Hung was given a lifetime achievement award at the New York Asian Film Festival, where four of his films were shown. Hung appears in and choreographed Ip Man 2 (2010). His role is that of a Hung Gar master who challenges Yip Man.

Television

In between films and special appearances, Hung has appeared in several East Asian television series. In 2003 he was in two mainland Chinese series – Undercover Cop with Fan Bingbing, followed by The Valley of Lost Vengeance (aka End Enmity Hollow). More recently, he played a master con-artist in the Taiwanese series Coming Lies and Wing Chun master Wong Wah-bo in Wing Chun, reprising the role he played in The Prodigal Son over 20 years earlier. He co-starred in the series alongside Yuen Biao, Nicholas Tse and his youngest son, Sammy Hung. And was in an episode of Waker Texas Ranger. Hung appeared as a guest judge on the China Beijing TV Station reality television series The Disciple, which aired in mainland China and was produced by, and featured, Jackie Chan. The aim of the program was to find a new star, skilled in acting and martial arts, to become Chan’s “successor”, the champion being awarded the lead role in a film. It concluded on 7 June 2008, with the series winner announced in Beijing.

In another mainland Chinese television series, The Shaolin Warriors, set during the Ming Dynasty, Hung played Big Foot, a Shaolin warrior monk joining General Qi Jiguang’s marines to help defend the nation against Japanese pirates. Sammy Hung also has a role, as Big Foot’s disciple.

Future

Forthcoming film roles for Hung include starring roles in another Daniel Lee film, entitled Duel and in Vincent Kok’s horror comedy, V for Vampire. These will be followed by a co-starring role alongside Bruce Liang in He Who Would Be King produced by Ju Long’s new film studio and Kevin Munroe’s War Monkeys for Dark Horse Indie, a branch of Dark Horse Entertainment. Hung is also expected to work once again with Stephen Chow, playing a role in the director’s forthcoming wuxia comedy film. The film is currently in the script-writing phase and is as-yet unnamed.

Hung has also directed and starred in another martial arts epic entitled Howling Arrow. According to Hung’s official website, it stars Aaron Kwok, Wu Jing, and Zhou Xun and was filmed for Tsui Siu-Ming’s Sundream Motion Pictures. Filming was supposed to begin in 2007, but the film appears to have been delayed indefinitely.

Filmography


Hung has starred in 75 films, and worked on over 230, beginning as a child actor whilst still attending the China Drama Academy. Upon leaving the opera school, he worked as an extra and stuntman, and progressed through other roles including fight choreographer, stunt co-ordinator, action director, actor, writer, producer and director.

Hung’s is starred in the most recent historic action film God of War (2017).

Film Production


Gar Bo Motion Picture Company

In 1978 Sammo Hung formed Gar Bo Motion Picture Company, a subsidiary of Golden Harvest, with director Karl Maka and former actor-choreographer Lau Kar Wing (brother of actors Lau Kar-leung and Gordon Liu). The company’s name consists of the “Gar” sound from Lau Kar Wing and Karl Maka (Mak Kar), and “Bo” from Hung Kam Bo.). The company disbanded in 1980, when Maka moved on to form Cinema City & Films Co. with Raymond Wong and Dean Shek. Gar Bo released two films, both starring Hung and Lau:

  • Dirty Tiger, Crazy Frog (1978)
  • Odd Couple (1979)

Bo Ho Film Company Ltd

1980 saw Raymond Chow pull one of Hung’s films from local cinemas after just two weeks. Hung responded by starting his own production company Bo Ho Film Company Ltd, allowing him to have greater control to produce Hong Kong films. Whilst Bo Ho produced, Golden Harvest still operated as distributors. In all, 40 films were released by Bo Ho, several of which starred Hung:

  • Encounters of the Spooky Kind (1980)
  • Long Arm of the Law (1984)
  • Pom Pom (1984)
  • Hocus Pocus (1984)
  • Mr. Vampire (1985)
  • Heart of Dragon (1985)
  • Those Merry Souls (1985)
  • Lucky Stars Go Places (1986)
  • Millionaire’s Express a.k.a. Shanghai Express (1986)
  • Paper Marriage (1986)
  • Righting Wrongs a.k.a. Above the Law (1986)
  • Rosa (1986)
  • The Strange Bedfellow (1986)
  • Mr. Vampire Part 2 (1986)
  • Eastern Condors (1987)
  • Mr. Vampire Part 3 (1987)
  • The Final Test (1987)
  • The Happy Bigamist (1987)
  • My Cousin, the Ghost (1987)
  • Scared Stiff (1987)
  • Sworn Brothers (1987)
  • To Err is Humane a.k.a. To Err is Human (1987)
  • China’s Last Eunuch a.k.a. Lai Shi, China’s Last Eunuch (1988)
  • Mr. Vampire Saga 4 (1988)
  • On the Run (1988)
  • Picture of a Nymph a.k.a. Portrait of a Nymph (1988)
  • One Husband Too Many (1988)
  • Blonde Fury (1989)
  • Three Against the World (1989)
  • A Fishy Story (1989)
  • Doctor’s Heart (1990)
  • Her Fatal Ways (1990)
  • Mortuary Blues (1990)
  • Shanghai, Shanghai a.k.a. Shanghai Encounter (1990)
  • She Shoots Straight a.k.a. Lethal Lady (1990)
  • Queens Bench III (1990)
  • The Top Bet (1991)
  • Lover at Large (1992)
  • Scorpion King a.k.a. Operation Scorpio (1992)

D&B Films Company Ltd

In 1983, Hung co-founded another production company, D&B Films Company Ltd (“D&B” being short for “Duk-Bo”), with Dickson Poon and John Shum. The company operated until 1992 and produced a total of 77 Hong Kong films:

  • Hong Kong 1941 (1984)
  • The Owl vs Bumbo a.k.a. The Owl vs Bombo (1984)
  • The Return of Pom Pom (1984)
  • The Island (1985)
  • It’s a Drink, It’s a Bomb (1985)
  • Mr. Boo Meets Pom Pom (1985)
  • Yes, Madam a.k.a. Police Assassins (1985)
  • Night Caller (1985)
  • Dream Lovers (1986)
  • Silent Love (1986)
  • Passion (1986)
  • Legacy of Rage (1986)
  • My Family (1986)
  • Pom Pom Strikes Back (1986)
  • Conduct Zero (1986)
  • In the Line of Duty a.k.a. Royal Warriors (1986)
  • Brotherhood (1986)
  • From Here to Prosperity (1986)
  • The Lunatics (1986)
  • Caper (1986)
  • Devoted to You (1986)
  • On the Red (1986)
  • Where’s Officer Tuba? (1986)
  • Kiss Me Goodbye (1986)
  • It’s a Mad Mad World (1987)
  • Porky’s Meatballs (1987)
  • The Wrong Couple a.k.a. The Wrong Couples (1987)
  • Wonder Women (1987)
  • Magnificent Warriors a.k.a. Yes, Madam 3 (1987)
  • You’re OK, I’m OK! (1987)
  • The Final Victory (1987)
  • Easy Money (1987)
  • The Gang Don’t Shoot Straight a.k.a. The Goofy Gang (1987)
  • An Autumn’s Tale (1987)
  • In the Line of Duty 3 a.k.a. Yes, Madam 2 (1987)
  • Sapporo Story (1987)
  • Heart To Hearts (1988)
  • It’s A Mad Mad World 2 (1988)
  • Tiger Cage (1988)
  • Fury (1988)
  • Classmate Party a.k.a. Student Union (1988)
  • In the Blood (1988)
  • Double Fattiness (1988)
  • Vengeance is Mine (1988)
  • Keep on Dancing (1988)
  • Bless This House (1988)
  • Women’s Prison (1988)
  • Darkside of Chinatown (1989)
  • Happy Together (1989)
  • In the Line of Duty 4 a.k.a. In the Line of Duty a.k.a. Yes, Madam 4 (1989)
  • Mr. Fortune (1989)
  • Unfaithfully Yours (1989)
  • It’s A Mad Mad World 3 (1989)
  • The Nobles (1989)
  • Funny Ghost (1989)
  • You Bet Your Life (1989)
  • A Bite of Love (1990)
  • Love is Love (1990)
  • Middle Man (1990)
  • Tiger Cage 2 (1990)
  • Heart into Hearts (1990)
  • BB 30 (1990)
  • Brave Young Girls (1990)
  • Look Out, Officer! (1990)
  • Perfect Girls (1990)
  • Vampire Settle on Police Camp (1990)
  • Forbidden Arsenal (1991)
  • The Perfect Match (1991)
  • The Plot (1991)
  • Sea Wolves (1991)
  • Dreams of Glory, A Boxer’s Story (1991)
  • Tiger Cage 3 (1991)
  • Black Cat (1991)
  • His Fatal Ways (1991)
  • Will of Iron (1991)
  • Black Cat 2 (1992)
  • Heart Against Hearts (1992)
  • KillZone (2005)

-The Martial Law(Star Sports)

Bojon Films Company Ltd

In 1989, Hung formed a new production company, Bojon Films Company Ltd. The company produced 5 films, all of which starred Hung:

  • Pedicab Driver (1989)
  • Encounters of the Spooky Kind 2 (1990)
  • Pantyhose Hero a.k.a. Pantyhose Killer (1990)
  • Slickers vs. Killers (1991)
  • Don’t Give a Damn a.k.a. Burger Cop (1995)

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Hung’s star, hand prints and autograph on the Avenue of Stars

Personal Life


  • Hung’s grandmother was martial-arts actress Chin Tsi-ang who starred in almost 80 films between 1941 and 2002. His grandfather, a film director and writer, Hung Chung Ho, directed over 40 films between 1937 and 1950.
  • Hung’s younger brother, Lee Chi Kit, has worked on almost 40 films, many of which Hung was also involved with. Lee also worked on Hung’s Martial Law series. He works primarily as a supporting actor and action director.
  • He has three sons and a daughter, Tin-Ming “Timmy” Hung (洪天明; born 1974), Tin Cheung “Jimmy” Hung (洪天祥; born 1977), Tin Chiu “Sammy” Hung (洪天照; born 1979) and Chao Yu “Stephanie” Hung (洪煦榆; born 1983) with Jo Eun-ok (曹恩玉), whom he grew up with in martial arts training school. He divorced Jo in 1994 and married model and actress Joyce Godenzi in 1995. Godenzi appeared in several of his films including The Haunted Island, Eastern Condors (both 1986), and Paper Marriage (1988) prior to the pair becoming a couple. She also appeared in Mr. Nice Guy (1997).
  • Timmy Hung has appeared alongside his father in SPL: Sha Po Lang, Legend of the Dragon, and Kung Fu Chefs, as well as having a recurring role in Sammo’s series, Martial Law.
  • Sammy Hung appeared as the nemesis to Nicholas Tse’s character in the 2007 television series Wing Chun, a remake of the original series broadcast in 1994, and the subsequent film Wing Chun. The series also starred Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao. Sammy also appeared alongside his father in the film Choy Lee Fut.
  • Hung is one of the celebrities honoured on the Avenue of Stars, Hong Kong.
    Hung is known for his large frame. Despite this, he is a surprisingly agile and formidable martial artist.
  • He has a circular scar on the right side of his face, just above his lip. In the early days of his film career, Hung was involved in a street fight outside a Kowloon nightclub, and was stabbed with a broken cola bottle.
  • On 5 August 2009, Hung became ill during the filming of Ip Man 2 in the Guangdong province of Foshan. He was admitted to hospital and underwent a heart surgery operation. He was discharged and returned to work within days. He cited a combination of his weight, his love of cigars and long filming hours resulting in fatigue and irregular meals as the cause.

In Popular Culture


  • A pop band from Wales named themselves Sammo Hung after the actor.
  • Master Elehung Kinpo, from Juken Sentai Gekiranger, is named after him. Coincidentally, Yū Mizushima, the voice actor for Elehung Kinpo, did the dubbing for Sammo Hung.
  • A martial artist named Samohan Kinpou is frequently referred to in the anime Negima?!

Billy Chow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Billy Chow (born Chow Bei-lei August 24, 1958 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada), (also credited as Billy Chau and Billy Chow Bei-lei) is a Hong Kong film actor, kickboxer, martial artist, and entrepreneur and is also a keen Boxing and Muay thai practitioner. Chow is the former WKA world kickboxing champion. Chow is perhaps best known for his roles as General Fujita in the 1994 film Fist of Legend, and Wong, Great Kick of the North in the 1996 film Tai Chi Boxer.

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Contents
1 Kickboxing career
1.1 World Kickboxing Association
2 History and early career
2.1 Acting
2.2 Retired from acting
3 Business
4 Filmography
4.1 Movies

Kickboxing Career


World Kickboxing Association

In the 1980s, Chow was the WKA super welterweight kickboxing champion of the world from 1984 to 1986. His final match on November 20, 2007, in which he lost via decision to Akarn Sanehha of Thailand.

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History and Early Career


Acting

In the 1980s, Chow played an elite soldier in the 1987 film Eastern Condors alongside Sammo Hung, Yuen Biao and Yuen Woo-ping. Chow played thugs in two Jackie Chan movies: Dragons Forever in 1988, and Miracles in 1989.

In the 1990s, Chow had roles in three Jet Li movies: Fist of Legend in 1994 as General Fujita, Meltdown in 1995 as Kong, and Dr. Wai in “The Scripture with No Words” in 1996 as Chan / Japanese Embassy Guard. Chow played Jade Tiger’s Brother in the 1995 film Iron Monkey 2 along with Donnie Yen. Chow played Wong, Great Kick of the North in the 1996 film Tai Chi Boxer along with Jacky Wu.

Retired from Acting

On August 26, 2006, Chow retired from acting at the age of 48, after his final film, Dragon in Fury.

Business


Chow currently trains fighters out of Billy’s Gym in Hong Kong, and Frank Lee’s Muay Thai in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Filmography


Movies

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Chow Yun-Fat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Chow Yun-fat

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Chow Yun-fat, SBS (born 18 May 1955), previously known as Donald Chow, is a Hong Kong actor. He is best known in Asia for his collaborations with filmmaker John Woo in the heroic bloodshed-genre films A Better Tomorrow, The Killer and Hard Boiled; and in the West for his roles as Li Mu-bai in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Sao Feng in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. He mainly plays in dramatic films and has won three Hong Kong Film Awards for Best Actor and two Golden Horse Awards for Best Actor in Taiwan.

In 2014, Chow was the second-highest earning actor in Hong Kong, earning HK$170 million (US$21.9 million).

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Contents
1 Personal life
2 Career
3 Book
4 Filmography
5 Video games
6 Awards and nominations
7 Wealth

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Personal Life


Chow was born in Lamma Island, Hong Kong, to a mother who was a cleaning lady and vegetable farmer, and a father who worked on a Shell Oil Company tanker. Chow grew up in a farming community on Lamma Island, in a house with no electricity. He woke up at dawn each morning to help his mother sell herbal jelly and Hakka tea-pudding on the streets; in the afternoons he went to work in the fields. His family moved to Kowloon when he was ten. At seventeen, he left school to help support the family by doing odd jobs including bellboy, postman, camera salesman and taxi driver. His life started to change after college when he responded to a newspaper advertisement and his actor-trainee application was accepted by TVB, the local television station. He signed a three-year contract with the studio and made his acting debut. Chow became a heartthrob and a familiar face in soap operas that were exported internationally.

Chow has been married twice; first in 1983, to Candice Yu, an actress from Asia Television; the marriage lasted nine months. In 1986, Chow married Singaporean Jasmine Tan. The couple have no children, although Chow has a goddaughter, Celine Ng, a former child model for Chickeeduck, McDonald’s, Toys’R’Us and other companies.

Career


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When Chow appeared in the 1980 TV series The Bund on TVB, it did not take long for him to become a household name in Hong Kong. The series, about the rise and fall of a gangster in 1930s Shanghai, was a hit throughout Asia and made Chow a star.

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God-of-Gamblers

Although Chow continued his TV success, his goal was to become a big-screen actor. However, his occasional ventures into low-budget films were disastrous. Success finally came when he teamed up with director John Woo in the 1986 gangster action-melodrama A Better Tomorrow, which swept the box offices in Asia and established Chow and Woo as megastars. A Better Tomorrow won him his first Best Actor award at the Hong Kong Film Awards. It was the highest-grossing film in Hong Kong history at the time, and set a new standard for Hong Kong gangster films. Taking the opportunity, Chow quit TV entirely. With his new image from A Better Tomorrow, he made many more ‘gun fu’ or ‘heroic bloodshed’ films, such as A Better Tomorrow 2 (1987), Prison on Fire, Prison on Fire II, The Killer (1989), A Better Tomorrow 3 (1990), Hard Boiled (1992) and City on Fire, an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs.

Chow may be best known for playing honorable tough guys, whether cops or criminals, but he has also starred in comedies like Diary of a Big Man (1988) and Now You See Love, Now You Don’t (1992) and romantic blockbusters such as Love in a Fallen City (1984) and An Autumn’s Tale (1987), for which he was named best actor at the Golden Horse Awards. He brought together his disparate personae in the 1989 film God of Gamblers (Du Shen), directed by the prolific Wong Jing, in which he was by turns suave charmer, a broad comedian and an action hero. The film surprised many, became immensely popular, broke Hong Kong’s all-time box office record, and spawned a series of gambling films as well as several comic sequels starring Andy Lau and Stephen Chow. The often tough demeanor and youthful appearance of Chow Yun-Fat’s characters has earned him the nickname “Babyface Killer”.

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Chow Yun-fat at the premiere of Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End in 2007

The Los Angeles Times proclaimed Chow Yun-Fat “the coolest actor in the world”. In the mid ’90s, Chow moved to Hollywood in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to duplicate his success in Asia. His first two films, The Replacement Killers (1998) and The Corruptor (1999), were box office disappointments. In his next film Anna and the King (1999), Chow teamed up with Jodie Foster, but the film suffered at the box office. Chow accepted the role of Li Mu-Bai in the (2000) film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. It became a winner at both the international box office and the Oscars. In 2003, Chow came back to Hollywood and starred in Bulletproof Monk. In 2006, he teamed up with Gong Li in the film Curse of the Golden Flower, directed by Zhang Yimou.

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In 2007, Chow played the pirate captain Sao Feng in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. However, his part was omitted when the movie was shown in mainland China, where government censors felt that Chow’s character “vilified and humiliated” Chinese people.

In the poorly received film Dragonball Evolution, Chow Yun-fat played Master Roshi.

In 2014, Chow returned to Hong Kong cinema in From Vegas to Macau. For the part, he lost 13 kg within 10 months.

In October 2014, Chow supported the Umbrella Movement, a civil rights movement for universal suffrage in Hong Kong. His political stance eventually resulted in censorship by the Chinese government.

In February 2015, Chow reprised his role as Ken in the sequel From Vegas to Macau II. He was paid 5 million USD (39 million HKD) for the film.

Book


On 26 June 2008, Chow released his first photo collection in Hong Kong, which includes pictures taken on the sets of his films. Proceeds from the book’s sales were donated to Sichuan earthquake victims. Published by Louis Vuitton, the books were sold in Vuitton’s Hong Kong and Paris stores.

Filmography


Chow has appeared in over 121 films and 24 television series.

Film

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Television Series


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Video Games


  • Stranglehold
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (video game)
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (video game)

Awards and Nominations


Hong Kong Film Awards

  • Best Actor Nomination for Hong Kong 1941
  • Best Actor Nomination for Women
  • Best Supporting Actor Nomination for Love Unto Waste
  • Best Actor for A Better Tomorrow
  • Best Actor Nomination for Prison on Fire
  • Best Actor Nomination for An Autumn’s Tale
  • Best Actor for City on Fire
  • Best Original Film Song Nomination for The Diary of a Big Man
  • Best Original Film Song Nomination for Triads: The Inside Story
  • Best Actor Nomination for God of Gamblers
  • Best Actor for All About Ah-Long
  • Best Actor Nomination for Once a Thief
  • Best Actor Nomination for Treasure Hunt
  • Best Actor Nomination for Peace Hotel
  • Best Actor Nomination for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
  • Best Actor Nomination for Curse of the Golden Flower
  • Best Supporting Actor Nomination for The Postmodern Life of My Aunt

(13 Best Actor nominations, 2 Best Supporting Actor nominations, 2 Best Original Film Song nominations)

Wealth


As of 2016, Chow’s net worth stands at US$80 million. Chow also said he would donate 99% of his wealth to charity via setting up a foundation to help the needy.

Stephen Chow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Stephen Chow Sing-chi (Chinese: 周星馳, born 22 June 1962) is a Chinese film director, actor, producer, political adviser of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference and martial artist.

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Eva Huang, also known as Huang Shengyi, plays a mute girl whom Sing tries to help when they were both children.

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Contents
1 Film career
2 Filmography
3 Awards

Film Career


Chow began his career as a temporary actor on television. He graduated from TVB’s acting classes in 1982. Chow began to find some success with the children’s programme 430 Space Shuttle. In 1987, Chow entered the movie industry through the film Final Justice, which won him the Taiwan Golden Horse Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Chow shot to stardom in The Final Combat (1989) and All for the Winner (1990). Fight Back to School (1991) became Hong Kong’s top-grossing film of all time. In 1994, he began directing films, starting with From Beijing with Love. In the later half of the 1990s, China began to warm to Chow’s films and he became a pop-culture phenomenon.

In 2001, his film Shaolin Soccer grossed over US$50 million worldwide. Chow won Best Director and Best Actor at the 2002 Hong Kong Film Awards, and the film went on to garner additional awards including a Blue Ribbon Awards for Best Foreign Language Film and the Golden Bauhinia Award for Best Picture and Best Director.

In 2004, his film Kung Fu Hustle grossed over US$106 million worldwide. Chow also won Best Director at the Taiwan Golden Horse Awards and Best Picture of Imagine Film Festival as well as twenty international awards.

Chow’s film CJ7 began filming in July 2006 in the eastern Chinese port of Ningbo. In August 2007 the film was given the title CJ7, a play on China’s successful Shenzhou manned space missions—Shenzhou 5 and Shenzhou 6. CJ7 became the highest-grossing film of all time in Malaysia.

In 2013, Chow’s film Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons became the highest-grossing Chinese film of all time.

In 2016, his new film The Mermaid broke numerous box office records: Biggest opening day, biggest single day gross after its seventh day of release, biggest opening week of all time in China. On February 19th, it became the highest grossing film of all time in China.

The Mermaid was released in Vietnam on February 10th, 2016. On March 14th, it became the 3rd highest grossing film of all time in Vietnam. It has now grossed over US$555 million worldwide and is the highest grossing movie of all time in Asia.

Stephen Chow became the ninth top-grossing Hollywood Director of 2016.

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Filmography


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Awards


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Unknown Facts About Kung Fu Hustle


While casting Sing’s love interest Fong, Chow stated that he wanted an innocent-looking girl for the role. Eva Huang was chosen from a pool of 8,000 girls.

Eva-Huang-in-Kung-Fu-Hustle

Eva Huang, also known as Huang Shengyi, plays a mute girl whom Sing tries to help when they were both children. Huang was a TV actress until then and Kung Fu Hustle was her film debut. When Chow was asked why he cast her, he replied that he enjoyed working with new actors and he “just had a feeling about her.” Huang chose not to have any dialogue so that her character could stand out through her gestures and body language.

The name “Pig Sty Alley” is a play on the name of the Walled City of Kowloon in Chinese. The city was a Chinese enclave in Hong Kong and well-known as a breeding ground of crime, slums, and disorder through most of the 20th century.

Kowloon-Walled-City

The Walled City was originally a Chinese military fort and became an enclave when China leased the New Territories to Britain in 1898. During World War II following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong, the city’s population dramatically rose, becoming 50,000 residents within 2.6 hectares (6.4 acres) by 1990. From the 1950s to 1970s, the Walled City had high rates of prostitution, drug abuse, and gambling and was controlled by local triads. The Hong Kong government announced plans to demolish it in January 1987. Following a laborious eviction process, demolition began in March 1993 and ended in April 1994. It was turned into Kowloon Walled City Park which opened in December 1995.

Kung Fu Hustle surpassed Chow’s previous film, Shaolin Soccer, becoming the highest-grossing movie made in Hong Kong in 2005. It was also the highest-grossing foreign language film in North America, even gaining a cult following.

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After opening in Hong Kong on December 23, 2004, Kung Fu Hustle earned HK$ 4,990,000 on its opening day. It stayed on top until early 2005 grossing a total of HK$ 61.27 million. In the US, it initially released as a two-week theatrical run in New York City and Los Angeles. After its success, it was soon released in 2,503 cinemas, the highest number of cinemas ever for a foreign language movie. Though not a blockbuster, Kung Fu Hustle became the highest-grossing foreign language movie in North America in 2005.

“Pig Sty Alley” was inspired by Chow’s own childhood memory of crowded apartment complexes in a Hong Kong slum neighborhood where he lived.

Pig-Sty-Alley-and-Early-Sketch

In the movie, the “Pig Sty Alley” is an impoverished place where you find all kinds of characters including retired Kung Fu masters who took up humble jobs to get on with life. Designing the alley was Stephen Chow’s first priority as it was the main location in the film. In an interview with the Observer, he stated that he was inspired by his own childhood memories of crowded, Hong Kong, slum neighborhoods.

Stephen Chow is a self-trained Kung Fu practitioner. He is a great fan of Bruce Lee and learned martial arts by imitating what he saw in the movies.

Stephen-Chow-Inspired-by-Bruce-Lee

Stephen Chow credits Bruce Lee for inspiring him to become a martial arts practitioner and an actor. Though he did attend Kung Fu classes in school for a short time, he couldn’t continue it because of his financial situation. So, instead, he would watch Bruce Lee’s movies and imitate the moves and exercises. Like Bruce Lee, he picked Wing Chun style.

Ti Lung

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

black-magic-ii-ti-lung

ti-lung

Tommy Tam Fu-Wing (born 19 August 1946), better known by his stage name Ti Lung, is a Hong Kong actor, known for his numerous starring roles in a string of Shaw Brothers Studio’s films, particularly The Blood Brothers,The Avenging Eagle, Clans of Intrigue, The Duel, The Sentimental Swordsman and its sequel, and in the classic A Better Tomorrow.

ti

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Contents
1 Background
2 Career
3 Personal life
4 The origin of the stage name “Ti Lung”
5 Filmography
5.1 Television

Background


Tam Fu Wing (Ti Lung) was born on 19 August in 1946 in a family with 4 members including parents, a younger sister and him in Guangdong Province, China . When he was 4 years old, the whole family moved to live in Hong Kong. He educated at Eton school in Hong Kong. But after his father’s dead, he had to terminate his study at the age of 18 to support his family.Initially, he was a deliver boy at a grocery shop where he often delivered milk, newspapers and groceries. At 24 years old,he trained as a tailor and studied Wing Chun of the master Jiu Wan to protect himself against street gangs.

Career


In 1968 Ti Lung responded to an advertisement placed by the Shaw Brothers after college, and applied at Shaw Acting Course, and upon completion was awarded a minor role in Chang Cheh’s Return of the One-Armed Swordsman starring Jimmy Wang Yu. Chang Cheh immediately recognized his potential and offered him the lead in his next production Dead End opposite Golden Chan Hung-lit, a role which would launch his career as one of the best known faces in classic Wuxia film. At that time, he continued to study Wing Chun under the martial arts master Jiu Wan who described him as having advantages of a strong body, intelligent, good footwork, and he also practices diligently. Besides, he was also taught other techniques such as: Judo, Muya Thai, Takewondo, Wushu… and riding horse. He became a common face associated with David Chiang, Alexander Fu Sheng, Ku Feng, Chen Kuan-Tai, the Venom Mob, and other Shaw Bros stars at the time, often cast as a dashing, noble hero as well as a capable martial artist.

Especially, he collaborated with the most revered Shaw director – Chang Cheh who gave him his explosive start along with fellow actor and frequent co-star David Chiang in over 20 films: Dead End (1969), Have Sword, Will Travel (1969), Vengeance (1970), The Heroic Ones (1970), The Duel (1971), Duel of Fists (1971), The Deadly Duo (1971), Angry Guest (1972), Four Riders (1972), The Blood Brothers (1973), The Pirate (1973)…. .Due to their success, the trio were known as “The Iron Triangle”. In this period time, one of the most feature films of Ti Lung is “The Blood Brothers” (1973) which helped him win The Special Award for Outstanding Performance at 11th Golden Horse Awards in Taiwan and the Special Jury Award at the Asian Film Awards in 1973. Soon after, Ti Lung moved forward teaming up with Lar Kar-Leung, Chu Yuan, Sun Chung, and Tong Gai to produce movies still loved today such as: The Magic blade (1976), Clans of Intrigue (1977), The Sentimental Swordsman (1977), The Avenging Eagle (1978), Shaolin Prince (1983)…In 1979, he won Best Actor Award at 25th Asian Film Awards as Black eagle Chik Ming-Sing in The Avenging Eagle in 1978.

After he left Shaw Brothers Studios in the 1980s, Ti Lung’s career took a turn for the worse until 1986, when John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow cast him opposite Chow Yun-fat in the role of a Triad member. The movie was a box office success and placed Ti Lung back in the public consciousness, although it changed his image from the handsome martial youth to the tortured, would-be hero gangster. It also helped him gain Best Actor Award at 23th Golden Horse Awards in 1986. After that role, Ti Lung’s next most recognisable appearance would be with Jackie Chan in Drunken Master II, in which he co-starred as Wong Kei-Ying, father of Chinese folk hero Wong Fei Hung. In 1994-95, Ti Lung lead-starred as Bao Zheng in a Hong Kong version of Justice Pao TV series for TVB. At the time this series was viewing on Hong Kong television, many fans in Mainland China and Hong Kong has compared Ti Lung/TVB’s Bao Zheng with Jin Chao-chun/Mainland China’s Bao Zheng. Ti Lung also worked with Andy Lau in Three Kingdoms: Resurrection of the Dragon as the legendary Guan Yu. From there, he has continued to work in television in a variety of roles.

In 1999, Ti Lung had a comeback in movies in the role of Sir Lung in “The kid” film which enabled him achieve Best Supporting actor at 19th Hong Kong Film Awards in 2000. In 2007, he received Life Achievement Award at Golden Bauhinia Awards. Until 2015, he played as Master Lam in an associated film between Hong Kong and Malaysia called “The Kid from the Big Apple”. The role made him gain Best Actor Award at 7th Macau International Movie Festival.The sequel of the film will premiere in Malaysia in November 2017.

Personal Life


Ti Lung got married with the beauty queen and actress Tao Man Ming in 1975. In 1980, she gave birth to a son, the actor Shaun Tam (his only child). He is also the uncle of Jerry Lamb and Jan Lamb.

The origin of the stage name “Ti Lung”


When he was a child, he admired the actor Alain Delon so much. Until 1968, he was at Shaw Brothers Studio, he asked the production to choose him a name which would be close to Alain Delon’s in the hope of being as good an actor as him . One day a secretary from the production (Mona Fong) found the name of Ti Lung for him, ‘Ti’ is a lucky name and ‘Lung’ means dragon.

Filmography


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Television

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David Chiang

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

DAVID CHIANG

David Chiang Da-wei (born Chiang Wei-nien on 29 June 1947 in Shanghai, Republic of China) is a Hong Kong actor, director and producer. A martial arts superstar in the 1970s under the Shaw Brothers Studio, he has appeared in over 130 films and over 30 television series.

Born in a thespian family, he is the younger brother of Paul Chun and an older half-brother of Derek Yee.

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Contents
1 Biography
2 Filmography
2.1 Film (as actor)
2.2 Film (as director)
2.3 Television

Biography


David_Chiang,_Avenue_of_Stars

David Chiang’s hand prints and autograph on the Avenue of Stars, Hong Kong

David Chiang’s mother Hung Wei (real name: Lo Chen) and father Yen Hua (real name: Chiang Ko-chi) were popular Chinese movie stars who arrived in Hong Kong in the late 1940s during the Chinese Civil War. Chiang began his acting career at a very early age, appearing in black and white films when he was only four years old.

In 1966 after diploma 2nd year and quit from school, while working as a stuntman and fight instructor for the Shaw Brothers Studio, he was spotted by director Chang Cheh, who immediately saw his potential and screen presence and became his mentor. Chang gave him the stage name David Chiang, even though his real English name was John.

With Wang Yu’s sudden departure in 1969, Run Run Shaw and his senior executives were looking for a new leading man and made Chiang an offer. With the guidance of Chang Cheh, Chiang won the Best Actor award at the 16th Asian Film Festival in 1970 for his role in Vengeance. In 1972, at the 18th Asian Film Festival, he won the Golden Horse Award for Best Actor for his role in Blood Brothers. In 1973, at the 19th Asian Film Festival, he won the Most Contemporary award for his role in The Generation Gap.

In 1973 Chiang left Hong Kong with his mentor Chang Cheh and set up an independent production company called Chang’s Scope Company. With the backing and encouragement of Run Run Shaw, their films continued to be distributed through Shaw’s channels. At Chang’s Scope Company, Chiang was able to try his hand at directing, producing and script writing. As the 1970s came to an end and the 1980s approached, Chiang continued acting, working with directors Lee Han Chiang, Hsueh Li Pao, Ho Meng-hua and Chia-Liang Liu. 1980 was also the start of his first television series, The Green Dragon Conspiracy, and this was followed by Princess Chang Ping and Dynasty. In the mid-1980s, Chiang worked with his two brothers, Paul Chun and Derek Yee, directing, producing and acting in the comedy Legend of the Owl. Chiang also acted in comedy movies The Challenger and The Loot, directed by Eric Tseng. In late 1980s into the 1990s Chiang directed the movies Heaven Can Help, Silent Love, The Wrong Couples, Mr. Handsome, Double Fattiness, My Dear Son, Will of Iron and Mother of a Different Kind. Since 2000 he has continued to work in movies and TV series, including Election, Daisy, Revolving Doors Of Vengeance, Lethal Weapons of Love and Passion, Land of Wealth, The Family Link and the 2007 television series The Gem of Life. He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 2006 for his role in the TVB series Revolving Doors of Vengeance.

In 2004, Chiang was inducted into The Avenue of Stars, which honours celebrities of the Hong Kong film industry. It is located along the Victoria Harbour waterfront in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong and modeled on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Filmography


Film (as actor)

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Film (as director)

  • The Drug Addict (1974)
  • A Mad World of Fools (1974)
  • The One-Armed Swordsmen (1976)
  • The Condemned (1976)
  • Whirlwind Kick (1977)
  • The Legend of the Owl (1981)
  • Heaven Can Help (1984)
  • Silent Love (1986)
  • Mr. Handsome (1987)
  • The Wrong Couples (1987)
  • Double Fattiness (1988)
  • My Dear Son (1989)
  • When East Meets West (1990)
  • Will of Iron (1991)
  • Mother of a Different Kind (1995)

Television

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Lo Lieh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

LO LIEH

Wang Lap Tat (June 29, 1939 – November 2, 2002), better known by his stage name Lo Lieh, was an Indonesian-born Hong Kong actor. Lo was perhaps best known as Chao Chih-Hao in the 1972 film King Boxer (a.k.a. Five Fingers of Death), Miyamoto in the 1977 film Fist of Fury II and General Tien Ta in the 1978 film The 36th Chamber of Shaolin.

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Contents
1 Early life
2 Acting
3 Personal life
4 Death
5 Filmography

Early Life


Lo Born in Pematangsiantar in June 29, 1939, spent his early life in Indonesia and then his parents sent him back to China and attended acting school in Hong Kong, he began his martial arts training in 1962 and joined the Shaw Brothers Studio in the same year and went on to become one of the most famous actors in Hong Kong kung fu films in the late 1960s and 1970s.

Acting


In the 1970s, Lo played Kao Hsia in the 1970 film Brothers Five, alongside Cheng Pei-pei. Lo played Ho Chiang in the 1974 film The Stranger and the Gunfighter, alongside Lee Van Cleef. Lo starred in the 1972 cult classic King Boxer a.k.a. Five Fingers of Death . In 1977, Lo portrayed Pai Mei in the Executioners from Shaolin and Miyamoto in Fist of Fury II, along with Bruce Li. Lo played General Tien Ta in the 1978 film The 36th Chamber of Shaolin, alongside Gordon Liu and Lee Hoi San.

In the 1980s, Lo directed and starred in the 1980 film Clan of the White Lotus, along with Gordon Liu. Lo played Triad Gangster Boss in the 1988 film Dragons Forever, alongside Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao. Lo played Fei in the 1989 film Miracles along with Jackie Chan, Richard Ng and Billy Chow.

In the 1990s, Lo played Chor Kun-lun in the 1991 film Sex and Zen alongside Lawrence Ng, Kent Cheng and Elvis Tsu. Lo played The General in the 1992 film Police Story 3: Super Cop alongside Jackie Chan and Michelle Yeoh.

In the 2000s, Lo played Wei Tung’s Uncle in the 2001 film The Vampire Combat, with Collin Chou and Valerie Chow. Lo’s last film was 2001’s Glass Tears, before retiring from acting at the age of 62.

Personal Life


Lo married Grace Tang Chia-li on April 15, 1976. Lo and his wife later divorced.

Death


On November 2, 2002, Lo died of heart attack, he was 63 years old.

Filmography


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Aaron Kwok

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

AARON KWOK

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Aaron Kwok Fu-shing (born 26 October 1965) is a Hong Kong singer, dancer and actor. Active since the 1980s, Kwok is considered one of the “Four Heavenly Kings” of Hong Kong. Kwok’s onstage dancing and displays is influenced by Michael Jackson. While most of his songs are in the dance-pop genre, he has experimented with rock and roll, ballad, rock, R&B, soul, electronica and traditional Chinese music.

Kwok earned 130 million HKD in 2014. He received the “Ten Most Outstanding Young Persons Award” in 2003.

Contents
1 Early life
2 Career
2.1 Early years
2.2 Music
2.3 Dancer
2.4 Acting
3 Personal life
3.1 Hobbies
3.2 Image
4 Discography
5 Filmography

Early Life


Kwok graduated from St. Joseph’s College in Hong Kong. After graduating from secondary school, Kwok worked as a junior staff in King Fook Gold & Jewellery Co. Ltd. His father, who owns a small gold retail store, desired that he gain experience in the business with the view of eventually handing the family business over to him. If not for one of Kwok’s brothers taking over the gold business, his father would not have allowed him to join the entertainment industry. In 1984, he was fired for prolonged absenteeism (sick leave) caused by a foot muscle injury from trying the splits at a party.

Career


Early years

After being fired from the jewellery company in 1984, at the age of 19, Kwok joined a dancer training course at TVB, where his talent for dancing was immediately recognised. Kwok then performed in music videos and variety shows for other singers. In 1987 he was transferred to the acting department of the talent training course and became a TV actor, where he played minor parts in TVB dramas. In 1990 he did a TV commercial in Taiwan for the Honda motorcycle DJ-1RR. The commercial gained him instant popularity with Taiwanese girls, and he immediately burst onto the music scene.

Music

Aaron Kwok's Concert in San Francisco, Nob Hill Masonic Center

Aaron performing in San Franscisco

Kwok then began his music career with three mandopop albums including the famous song “Loving You Forever” (對你愛不完) to accompany his dance moves. After his success in Taiwan, he returned to Hong Kong in 1991 to do Cantopop. The next few years saw his popularity reach fever-pitch, and he was soon ranked as one of the “Four Heavenly Kings”. Kwok became one of Hong Kong and Asia’s most prominent pop stars. He won his first major awards with the 1991 Jade Solid Gold Top 10 Awards and 1991 RTHK Top 10 Gold Songs Awards. He would then win a major award every year until 2001. As a solo performer, his sell-out concerts in Hong Kong, mainland China, United States, Canada, Singapore, Malaysia and other countries total over 200 to date. In 1999 he won his first “Asia Pacific most popular artist” award. Aaron Kwok will begin his 2011 tour on 16 April and his first stop is in Shanghai. Aaron Kwok has also created the choreography with Sunny Wong for the group As One.

Janet Jackson collaborated with Aaron Kwok and Ricky Martin for international versions of “Ask for More”, a promotional single and commercial released as part of an advertising campaign for Pepsi. A full-length music video of the version with Kwok was also released in Asian markets.

Dancer

As soon as Kwok entered the music industry in 1991, he started a fast-dancing trend (勁歌熱舞). Kwok’s onstage dancing and displays has been known to be influenced by Michael Jackson. Later in his career, he is known to have won a prestigious “Top ten Hong Kong dance award” (十大舞蹈家年獎). Of all the performing arts at which Kwok excels, stage appearances remain his perennial favourite. His dance accomplishments are also matched with stage displays. On 17 February 2008, he held an “Aaron Kwok De Show Reel Extension Live” concert at the Hong Kong AsiaWorld Arena with the largest revolving stage measured at 10m x 9.44m and created a new entry for the Guinness Book of World Records.

Acting

Over the years, Kwok has also been active in other media such as TV commercials and acting. He began his acting career with the TVB series Rise of Genghis Khan, and the 1988 series Twilight of a Nation about the Taiping Rebellion. One of his more noticeable role was for the 1996 TVB drama series Wars of Bribery where he plays an ICAC special-agent with Athena Chu.

He also starred in various movies. At the Taiwan’s 42nd Golden Horse Awards ceremony on 13 November 2005, Kwok was the surprise winner of Best Leading Actor award for his role in the film Divergence. It was Kwok’s first Golden Horse nomination and beat veteran Hong Kong star Tony Leung Ka-fai to win the honour. He won the Best Actor Award again at the 43rd Golden Horse Awards on 24 November 2006 for his role in the film After This Our Exile. He became only the second actor in the history of the Golden Horse Awards to win the Best Actor Award consecutively. Jackie Chan first accomplished this back in the 1992-3.

Along with Zhang Ziyi, Kwok stars in an AIDS-themed film Love for Life, which premiered on 10 May 2010.

In 2016, Kwok won his first Hong Kong Film Award for Best Actor for his role in the crime thriller film, Port of Call, at the 35th Hong Kong Film Awards. He has also starred in such movies as The Monkey King and Storm Riders

Personal Life


Hobbies

800px-2010_Aaron_Kwok_Renault_Clio_race_car

Aaron Kwok’s 2010 Clio Cup China race car.

Kwok has been known as a collector of sports cars as well as an amateur of motor racing. He participated in a Ferrari F355 race at the Macau Grand Prix, a Formula Campus charity race. Other notable participations include the Porsche Carrera Cup Asia, where he raced with a Porsche 911 GT3.

He is known as a car fanatic and has a large collection of notable cars. Some of his collection include the Audi R8 GT Spyder, Ferrari F50, F512M, F355 GTS, F360 Modena, Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano, Ferrari California, Ferrari F430 Spider, Lamborghini Diablo SE30, Mercedes-Benz SL600, Mercedes CLK DTM AMG, Porsche 911 Turbo. Porsche 911 GT3 RS mk2 Other cars include the Enzo Ferrari, a Carbon version Pagani Zonda F, Lamborghini Murciélago, Gallardo, Lamborghini Aventador 50th Anniversario Roadster, Lamborghini Gallardo Superleggera, Porsche 996 GT3, Nissan GT-R.

Image

He was famous for popularising a new type of “center-split hair style” that widely imitated during the 1990s. Throughout his career he did change his hair style numerous times including styles such as the five-five split or the four-six split.

Discography


  • 1990
    • Loving You Never Stop
  • 1991
    • Should I Leave Quietly? [Single]
    • Who Can Tell Me Finally? [Single]
  • 1992
    • Please Bring My Affection Home (1st Mandarin Collection)
    • Loving You
    • Dancing Never Stop, Loving Never Stop, Singing Never Stop (1st Cantonese Album)
    • Marlboro Red Hot Hits: Heat Moves Lalala
  • 1993
    • Deep Loving You – Aaron Kwok (2nd Mandarin Collection)
    • Leaving All My Love To You
    • Without Your Love
    • Dream Can’t Be Kept
    • Merry X-Mas [Single]
  • 1994
    • AK-47 (4 cantonese new songs + cantonese & mandarin collection)
    • Starts From Zero (Cantonese & Mandarin Collection)
    • The Wild City (1st Album released by Warner Music)
    • The Horizon
    • A Moment Of Romance II OST
    • Desire [Single]
    • Desire (Japanese Version) [Single]
    • Temptation of the Iron Mask
    • Elution/Good Gal (Remix)
    • Lover For A Whole Life (Mandarin Collection)
    • Romance Iron Mask Moving Temptation (Remix)
  • 1995
    • My Starting Point Is Here
    • You Are My Everything (EP)
    • Pure Legend
    • Wind Can’t Stop
    • Memorandum
    • Memorandum (Photo Album)
  • 1996
    • Aaron Kwok Golden Songs : Memorandum Collection
    • Love Dove
    • The GIG Kingdom (EP)
    • Listen to the Wind’s Song
  • 1997
    • Listen to the Wind (karaoke remix)
    • Warner MasterSonic Vol 1: Aaron Kwok
    • Aaron Kwok Live in Concert 1996
    • Who Will Remember Me?
    • Love Call
    • Duplicate Soul – Duplicate Again (Remix)
    • Devoted
    • Generation Next
  • 1998
    • Code In The Wind
    • Warner MasterSonic Vol 2: Aaron Kwok
    • Best To Sing Mandarin 1998
    • Aaron Kwok The Best Remix
    • A Magic To City
    • Best Hits of Aaron (songs from his previous label)
  • 1999
    • Pepsi Aaron Kwok Live in Concert 1998
    • Ask For More (EP)
    • Amazing Dream [Album]
    • Amazing Dream(Version 2)
    • Amazing Dream (Big Box)
    • So Afraid
    • So Afraid (Happy New Year Version)
    • Hip Hip Hurray Greatest 16 Hits 1999
    • Hip Hip Hurray Greatest 16 Hits 1999 (Singapore Version, with 2 mandarin songs)
  • 2000
    • Journey, Cheer
    • And I Hate You So OST
    • Fascinating
    • China Strike Force OST
    • Fearless vs Future (EP)
  • 2001
    • Pepsi Aaron Kwok Live On Stage 2000/01
    • 34 Best Choice of Aaron Kwok HDCD (Combination of Warner MasterSonic 1&2)
    • Xin Tian Di + Para Para Sakura OST
    • Pure Energy Collection
    • Absolute
  • 2002
    • Aaron Kwok & Friends in Concert 251101
    • Beyblade (3″CD,EP)
    • Aaron Kwok Nicam Greatest Hits 2002 (Love.Stage)
    • Aaron Kwok AA+ Best Hits! (Taiwan Version of Nicam Greatest Hits)
    • Burning Flame 2 OST
    • The Power Of Love 2002
  • 2003
    • In The Still Of The Night
    • In The Still of The Night (Special Version)
  • Romancing Hong Kong OST
  • 2004
    • AK Trilogy Yours Truly Greatest Hits I II III
  • 2005
    • Thematic (AVCD, EP)
  • 2006
    • My Nation
    • My Nation Plus [1 additional single (Kid of Wind)]
    • Aaron Kwok: The Best Collection (2DVD + 2CD)
  • 2008
    • Aaron Kwok de Show Reel Live in Concert 2007/2008
  • 2009
    • Aaron Kwok Greatest Hits (2CD)
  • 2010
    • Aaron Kwok Never Ending Love

Filmography


Film

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Television Series


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